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  1. 09 Sep, 2009 1 commit
  2. 29 Aug, 2009 2 commits
  3. 25 Aug, 2009 1 commit
  4. 03 Aug, 2009 2 commits
  5. 02 Aug, 2009 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      RTS tidyup sweep, first phase · a2a67cd5
      Simon Marlow authored
      The first phase of this tidyup is focussed on the header files, and in
      particular making sure we are exposinng publicly exactly what we need
      to, and no more.
      
       - Rts.h now includes everything that the RTS exposes publicly,
         rather than a random subset of it.
      
       - Most of the public header files have moved into subdirectories, and
         many of them have been renamed.  But clients should not need to
         include any of the other headers directly, just #include the main
         public headers: Rts.h, HsFFI.h, RtsAPI.h.
      
       - All the headers needed for via-C compilation have moved into the
         stg subdirectory, which is self-contained.  Most of the headers for
         the rest of the RTS APIs have moved into the rts subdirectory.
      
       - I left MachDeps.h where it is, because it is so widely used in
         Haskell code.
       
       - I left a deprecated stub for RtsFlags.h in place.  The flag
         structures are now exposed by Rts.h.
      
       - Various internal APIs are no longer exposed by public header files.
      
       - Various bits of dead code and declarations have been removed
      
       - More gcc warnings are turned on, and the RTS code is more
         warning-clean.
      
       - More source files #include "PosixSource.h", and hence only use
         standard POSIX (1003.1c-1995) interfaces.
      
      There is a lot more tidying up still to do, this is just the first
      pass.  I also intend to standardise the names for external RTS APIs
      (e.g use the rts_ prefix consistently), and declare the internal APIs
      as hidden for shared libraries.
      a2a67cd5
  6. 28 Jun, 2009 1 commit
  7. 29 Jul, 2009 1 commit
  8. 23 Jul, 2009 1 commit
  9. 13 Jun, 2009 2 commits
  10. 02 Jun, 2009 2 commits
  11. 16 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  12. 15 Feb, 2008 1 commit
  13. 14 Jun, 2008 1 commit
  14. 17 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  15. 02 Apr, 2008 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Do not #include external header files when compiling via C · c245355e
      Simon Marlow authored
      This has several advantages:
      
       - -fvia-C is consistent with -fasm with respect to FFI declarations:
         both bind to the ABI, not the API.
      
       - foreign calls can now be inlined freely across module boundaries, since
         a header file is not required when compiling the call.
      
       - bootstrapping via C will be more reliable, because this difference
         in behavour between the two backends has been removed.
      
      There is one disadvantage:
      
       - we get no checking by the C compiler that the FFI declaration
         is correct.
      
      So now, the c-includes field in a .cabal file is always ignored by
      GHC, as are header files specified in an FFI declaration.  This was
      previously the case only for -fasm compilations, now it is also the
      case for -fvia-C too.
      c245355e
  16. 25 Aug, 2007 1 commit
  17. 27 Jul, 2007 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Pointer Tagging · 6015a94f
      Simon Marlow authored
        
      This patch implements pointer tagging as per our ICFP'07 paper "Faster
      laziness using dynamic pointer tagging".  It improves performance by
      10-15% for most workloads, including GHC itself.
      
      The original patches were by Alexey Rodriguez Yakushev
      <mrchebas@gmail.com>, with additions and improvements by me.  I've
      re-recorded the development as a single patch.
      
      The basic idea is this: we use the low 2 bits of a pointer to a heap
      object (3 bits on a 64-bit architecture) to encode some information
      about the object pointed to.  For a constructor, we encode the "tag"
      of the constructor (e.g. True vs. False), for a function closure its
      arity.  This enables some decisions to be made without dereferencing
      the pointer, which speeds up some common operations.  In particular it
      enables us to avoid costly indirect jumps in many cases.
      
      More information in the commentary:
      
      http://hackage.haskell.org/trac/ghc/wiki/Commentary/Rts/HaskellExecution/PointerTagging
      6015a94f
  18. 06 Jul, 2007 1 commit
  19. 24 Apr, 2007 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Make ticky work, at least partly, on 64-bit machines · a01188d1
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      The ticky StgEntCounter structure was trying to be clever by using a
      fixed-width 32-bit field for the registeredp value.  But the code generators
      are not up to handling structures packed tightly like this (on a 64-bit
      architecture); result seg-fault on 64-bit.
      
      Really there should be some complaint from the code generators, not simply
      a seg fault.
      
      Anyway I switched to using native words for StgEntCounter fields, and
      now at least it works.
      a01188d1
  20. 07 Feb, 2007 1 commit
    • chevalier@alum.wellesley.edu's avatar
      Lightweight ticky-ticky profiling · 5ddee764
      chevalier@alum.wellesley.edu authored
      The following changes restore ticky-ticky profiling to functionality
      from its formerly bit-rotted state. Sort of. (It got bit-rotted as part
      of the switch to the C-- back-end.)
      
      The way that ticky-ticky is supposed to work is documented in Section 5.7
      of the GHC manual (though the manual doesn't mention that it hasn't worked
      since sometime around 6.0, alas). Changes from this are as follows (which
      I'll document on the wiki):
      
      * In the past, you had to build all of the libraries with way=t in order to
      use ticky-ticky, because it entailed a different closure layout. No longer.
      You still need to do make way=t in rts/ in order to build the ticky RTS,
      but you should now be able to mix ticky and non-ticky modules.
      
      * Some of the counters that worked in the past aren't implemented yet.
      I was originally just trying to get entry counts to work, so those should
      be correct. The list of counters was never documented in the first place,
      so I hope it's not too much of a disaster that some don't appear anymore.
      Someday, someone (perhaps me) should document all the counters and what 
      they do. For now, all of the counters are either accurate (or at least as
      accurate as they always were), zero, or missing from the ticky profiling
      report altogether.
      
      This hasn't been particularly well-tested, but these changes shouldn't
      affect anything except when compiling with -fticky-ticky (famous last
      words...)
      
      Implementation details:
      
      I got rid of StgTicky.h, which in the past had the macros and declarations 
      for all of the ticky counters. Now, those macros are defined in Cmm.h.
      StgTicky.h was still there for inclusion in C code. Now, any remaining C
      code simply cannot call the ticky macros -- or rather, they do call those
      macros, but from the perspective of C code, they're defined as no-ops. 
      (This shouldn't be too big a problem.)
      
      I added a new file TickyCounter.h that has all the declarations for ticky
      counters, as well as dummy macros for use in C code. Someday, these 
      declarations should really be automatically generated, since they need
      to be kept consistent with the macros defined in Cmm.h.
      
      Other changes include getting rid of the header that was getting added to
      closures before, and getting rid of various code having to do with eager
      blackholing and permanent indirections (the changes under compiler/ 
      and rts/Updates.*).
      5ddee764
  21. 10 Nov, 2006 1 commit
  22. 24 Oct, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Split GC.c, and move storage manager into sm/ directory · ab0e778c
      Simon Marlow authored
      In preparation for parallel GC, split up the monolithic GC.c file into
      smaller parts.  Also in this patch (and difficult to separate,
      unfortunatley):
        
        - Don't include Stable.h in Rts.h, instead just include it where
          necessary.
        
        - consistently use STATIC_INLINE in source files, and INLINE_HEADER
          in header files.  STATIC_INLINE is now turned off when DEBUG is on,
          to make debugging easier.
        
        - The GC no longer takes the get_roots function as an argument.
          We weren't making use of this generalisation.
      ab0e778c
  23. 08 Jun, 2006 1 commit
  24. 07 Jun, 2006 1 commit
  25. 18 May, 2006 1 commit
  26. 07 Apr, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Reorganisation of the source tree · 0065d5ab
      Simon Marlow authored
      Most of the other users of the fptools build system have migrated to
      Cabal, and with the move to darcs we can now flatten the source tree
      without losing history, so here goes.
      
      The main change is that the ghc/ subdir is gone, and most of what it
      contained is now at the top level.  The build system now makes no
      pretense at being multi-project, it is just the GHC build system.
      
      No doubt this will break many things, and there will be a period of
      instability while we fix the dependencies.  A straightforward build
      should work, but I haven't yet fixed binary/source distributions.
      Changes to the Building Guide will follow, too.
      0065d5ab
  27. 09 Feb, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Merge the smp and threaded RTS ways · eba7b660
      Simon Marlow authored
      Now, the threaded RTS also includes SMP support.  The -smp flag is a
      synonym for -threaded.  The performance implications of this are small
      to negligible, and it results in a code cleanup and reduces the number
      of combinations we have to test.
      eba7b660
  28. 18 Jan, 2006 1 commit
  29. 25 Nov, 2005 2 commits
  30. 21 Oct, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-10-21 14:02:17 by simonmar] · 03a9ff01
      simonmar authored
      Big re-hash of the threaded/SMP runtime
      
      This is a significant reworking of the threaded and SMP parts of
      the runtime.  There are two overall goals here:
      
        - To push down the scheduler lock, reducing contention and allowing
          more parts of the system to run without locks.  In particular,
          the scheduler does not require a lock any more in the common case.
      
        - To improve affinity, so that running Haskell threads stick to the
          same OS threads as much as possible.
      
      At this point we have the basic structure working, but there are some
      pieces missing.  I believe it's reasonably stable - the important
      parts of the testsuite pass in all the (normal,threaded,SMP) ways.
      
      In more detail:
      
        - Each capability now has a run queue, instead of one global run
          queue.  The Capability and Task APIs have been completely
          rewritten; see Capability.h and Task.h for the details.
      
        - Each capability has its own pool of worker Tasks.  Hence, Haskell
          threads on a Capability's run queue will run on the same worker
          Task(s).  As long as the OS is doing something reasonable, this
          should mean they usually stick to the same CPU.  Another way to
          look at this is that we're assuming each Capability is associated
          with a fixed CPU.
      
        - What used to be StgMainThread is now part of the Task structure.
          Every OS thread in the runtime has an associated Task, and it
          can ask for its current Task at any time with myTask().
      
        - removed RTS_SUPPORTS_THREADS symbol, use THREADED_RTS instead
          (it is now defined for SMP too).
      
        - The RtsAPI has had to change; we must explicitly pass a Capability
          around now.  The previous interface assumed some global state.
          SchedAPI has also changed a lot.
      
        - The OSThreads API now supports thread-local storage, used to
          implement myTask(), although it could be done more efficiently
          using gcc's __thread extension when available.
      
        - I've moved some POSIX-specific stuff into the posix subdirectory,
          moving in the direction of separating out platform-specific
          implementations.
      
        - lots of lock-debugging and assertions in the runtime.  In particular,
          when DEBUG is on, we catch multiple ACQUIRE_LOCK()s, and there is
          also an ASSERT_LOCK_HELD() call.
      
      What's missing so far:
      
        - I have almost certainly broken the Win32 build, will fix soon.
      
        - any kind of thread migration or load balancing.  This is high up
          the agenda, though.
      
        - various performance tweaks to do
      
        - throwTo and forkProcess still do not work in SMP mode
      03a9ff01
  31. 24 May, 2005 1 commit
  32. 10 May, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-05-10 13:25:41 by simonmar] · bf821981
      simonmar authored
      Two SMP-related changes:
      
        - New storage manager interface:
      
          bdescr *allocateLocal(StgRegTable *reg, nat words)
      
          which allocates from the current thread's nursery (being careful
          not to clash with the heap pointer).  It can do this without
          taking any locks; the lock only has to be taken if a block needs
          to be allocated.  allocateLocal() is now used instead of allocate()
          in a few PrimOps.
      
          This removes locks from most Integer operations, cutting down
          the overhead for SMP a bit more.
      
          To make this work, we have to be able to grab the current thread's
          Capability out of thin air (i.e. when called from GMP), so the
          Capability subsystem needs to keep a hash from thread IDs to
          Capabilities.
      
        - Small MVar optimisation: instead of taking the global
          storage-manager lock, do our own locking of MVars with a bit of
          inline assembly (x86 only for now).
      bf821981
  33. 16 Feb, 2005 1 commit
  34. 01 Feb, 2005 1 commit
  35. 28 Jan, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-01-28 12:55:17 by simonmar] · 153b9cb9
      simonmar authored
      Rationalise the BUILD,HOST,TARGET defines.
      
      Recall that:
      
        - build is the platform we're building on
        - host is the platform we're running on
        - target is the platform we're generating code for
      
      The change is that now we take these definitions as applying from the
      point of view of the particular source code being built, rather than
      the point of view of the whole build tree.
      
      For example, in RTS and library code, we were previously testing the
      TARGET platform.  But under the new rule, the platform on which this
      code is going to run is the HOST platform.  TARGET only makes sense in
      the compiler sources.
      
      In practical terms, this means that the values of BUILD, HOST & TARGET
      may vary depending on which part of the build tree we are in.
      
      Actual changes:
      
       - new file: includes/ghcplatform.h contains platform defines for
         the RTS and library code.
      
       - new file: includes/ghcautoconf.h contains the autoconf settings
         only (HAVE_BLAH).  This is so that we can get hold of these
         settings independently of the platform defines when necessary
         (eg. in GHC).
      
       - ghcconfig.h now #includes both ghcplatform.h and ghcautoconf.h.
      
       - MachRegs.h, which is included into both the compiler and the RTS,
         now has to cope with the fact that it might need to test either
         _TARGET_ or _HOST_ depending on the context.
      
       - the compiler's Makefile now generates
           stage{1,2,3}/ghc_boot_platform.h
         which contains platform defines for the compiler.  These differ
         depending on the stage, of course: in stage2, the HOST is the
         TARGET of stage1.  This was wrong before.
      
       - The compiler doesn't get platform info from Config.hs any more.
         Previously it did (sometimes), but unless we want to generate
         a new Config.hs for each stage we can't do this.
      
       - GHC now helpfully defines *_{BUILD,HOST}_{OS,ARCH} automatically
         in CPP'd Haskell source.
      
       - ghcplatform.h defines *_TARGET_* for backwards compatibility
         (ghcplatform.h is included by ghcconfig.h, which is included by
         config.h, so code which still #includes config.h will get the TARGET
         settings as before).
      
       - The Users's Guide is updated to mention *_HOST_* rather than
         *_TARGET_*.
      
       - coding-style.html in the commentary now contains a section on
         platform defines.  There are further doc updates to come.
      
      Thanks to Wolfgang Thaller for pointing me in the right direction.
      153b9cb9