1. 28 Jul, 2014 1 commit
  2. 25 Nov, 2011 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Time handling overhaul · 6b109851
      Simon Marlow authored
      Terminology cleanup: the type "Ticks" has been renamed "Time", which
      is an StgWord64 in units of TIME_RESOLUTION (currently nanoseconds).
      The terminology "tick" is now used consistently to mean the interval
      between timer signals.
      
      The ticker now always ticks in realtime (actually CLOCK_MONOTONIC if
      we have it).  Before it used CPU time in the non-threaded RTS and
      realtime in the threaded RTS, but I've discovered that the CPU timer
      has terrible resolution (at least on Linux) and isn't much use for
      profiling.  So now we always use realtime.  This should also fix
      
      The default tick interval is now 10ms, except when profiling where we
      drop it to 1ms.  This gives more accurate profiles without affecting
      runtime too much (<1%).
      
      Lots of cleanups - the resolution of Time is now in one place
      only (Rts.h) rather than having calculations that depend on the
      resolution scattered all over the RTS.  I hope I found them all.
      6b109851
  3. 23 Jul, 2011 1 commit
    • Ian Lynagh's avatar
      Fix heap profiling times · 4f8cfaf9
      Ian Lynagh authored
      Now that the heap census runs in the middle of garbage collections,
      the "CPU time" it was calculating included any CPU time used so far
      in the current GC. This could cause CPU time to appear to go down,
      which means hp2ps complained about "samples out of sequence".
      
      I'm not sure if this is the nicest way to solve this (maybe resurrecting
      mut_user_time_during_GC would be better?) but it gets things working again.
      4f8cfaf9
  4. 15 Dec, 2010 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Implement stack chunks and separate TSO/STACK objects · f30d5273
      Simon Marlow authored
      This patch makes two changes to the way stacks are managed:
      
      1. The stack is now stored in a separate object from the TSO.
      
      This means that it is easier to replace the stack object for a thread
      when the stack overflows or underflows; we don't have to leave behind
      the old TSO as an indirection any more.  Consequently, we can remove
      ThreadRelocated and deRefTSO(), which were a pain.
      
      This is obviously the right thing, but the last time I tried to do it
      it made performance worse.  This time I seem to have cracked it.
      
      2. Stacks are now represented as a chain of chunks, rather than
         a single monolithic object.
      
      The big advantage here is that individual chunks are marked clean or
      dirty according to whether they contain pointers to the young
      generation, and the GC can avoid traversing clean stack chunks during
      a young-generation collection.  This means that programs with deep
      stacks will see a big saving in GC overhead when using the default GC
      settings.
      
      A secondary advantage is that there is much less copying involved as
      the stack grows.  Programs that quickly grow a deep stack will see big
      improvements.
      
      In some ways the implementation is simpler, as nothing special needs
      to be done to reclaim stack as the stack shrinks (the GC just recovers
      the dead stack chunks).  On the other hand, we have to manage stack
      underflow between chunks, so there's a new stack frame
      (UNDERFLOW_FRAME), and we now have separate TSO and STACK objects.
      The total amount of code is probably about the same as before.
      
      There are new RTS flags:
      
         -ki<size> Sets the initial thread stack size (default 1k)  Egs: -ki4k -ki2m
         -kc<size> Sets the stack chunk size (default 32k)
         -kb<size> Sets the stack chunk buffer size (default 1k)
      
      -ki was previously called just -k, and the old name is still accepted
      for backwards compatibility.  These new options are documented.
      f30d5273
  5. 17 Jun, 2010 1 commit
  6. 09 Sep, 2009 1 commit
  7. 05 Aug, 2009 1 commit
  8. 02 Aug, 2009 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      RTS tidyup sweep, first phase · a2a67cd5
      Simon Marlow authored
      The first phase of this tidyup is focussed on the header files, and in
      particular making sure we are exposinng publicly exactly what we need
      to, and no more.
      
       - Rts.h now includes everything that the RTS exposes publicly,
         rather than a random subset of it.
      
       - Most of the public header files have moved into subdirectories, and
         many of them have been renamed.  But clients should not need to
         include any of the other headers directly, just #include the main
         public headers: Rts.h, HsFFI.h, RtsAPI.h.
      
       - All the headers needed for via-C compilation have moved into the
         stg subdirectory, which is self-contained.  Most of the headers for
         the rest of the RTS APIs have moved into the rts subdirectory.
      
       - I left MachDeps.h where it is, because it is so widely used in
         Haskell code.
       
       - I left a deprecated stub for RtsFlags.h in place.  The flag
         structures are now exposed by Rts.h.
      
       - Various internal APIs are no longer exposed by public header files.
      
       - Various bits of dead code and declarations have been removed
      
       - More gcc warnings are turned on, and the RTS code is more
         warning-clean.
      
       - More source files #include "PosixSource.h", and hence only use
         standard POSIX (1003.1c-1995) interfaces.
      
      There is a lot more tidying up still to do, this is just the first
      pass.  I also intend to standardise the names for external RTS APIs
      (e.g use the rts_ prefix consistently), and declare the internal APIs
      as hidden for shared libraries.
      a2a67cd5
  9. 07 Apr, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Reorganisation of the source tree · 0065d5ab
      Simon Marlow authored
      Most of the other users of the fptools build system have migrated to
      Cabal, and with the move to darcs we can now flatten the source tree
      without losing history, so here goes.
      
      The main change is that the ghc/ subdir is gone, and most of what it
      contained is now at the top level.  The build system now makes no
      pretense at being multi-project, it is just the GHC build system.
      
      No doubt this will break many things, and there will be a period of
      instability while we fix the dependencies.  A straightforward build
      should work, but I haven't yet fixed binary/source distributions.
      Changes to the Building Guide will follow, too.
      0065d5ab
  10. 21 Oct, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-10-21 14:02:17 by simonmar] · 03a9ff01
      simonmar authored
      Big re-hash of the threaded/SMP runtime
      
      This is a significant reworking of the threaded and SMP parts of
      the runtime.  There are two overall goals here:
      
        - To push down the scheduler lock, reducing contention and allowing
          more parts of the system to run without locks.  In particular,
          the scheduler does not require a lock any more in the common case.
      
        - To improve affinity, so that running Haskell threads stick to the
          same OS threads as much as possible.
      
      At this point we have the basic structure working, but there are some
      pieces missing.  I believe it's reasonably stable - the important
      parts of the testsuite pass in all the (normal,threaded,SMP) ways.
      
      In more detail:
      
        - Each capability now has a run queue, instead of one global run
          queue.  The Capability and Task APIs have been completely
          rewritten; see Capability.h and Task.h for the details.
      
        - Each capability has its own pool of worker Tasks.  Hence, Haskell
          threads on a Capability's run queue will run on the same worker
          Task(s).  As long as the OS is doing something reasonable, this
          should mean they usually stick to the same CPU.  Another way to
          look at this is that we're assuming each Capability is associated
          with a fixed CPU.
      
        - What used to be StgMainThread is now part of the Task structure.
          Every OS thread in the runtime has an associated Task, and it
          can ask for its current Task at any time with myTask().
      
        - removed RTS_SUPPORTS_THREADS symbol, use THREADED_RTS instead
          (it is now defined for SMP too).
      
        - The RtsAPI has had to change; we must explicitly pass a Capability
          around now.  The previous interface assumed some global state.
          SchedAPI has also changed a lot.
      
        - The OSThreads API now supports thread-local storage, used to
          implement myTask(), although it could be done more efficiently
          using gcc's __thread extension when available.
      
        - I've moved some POSIX-specific stuff into the posix subdirectory,
          moving in the direction of separating out platform-specific
          implementations.
      
        - lots of lock-debugging and assertions in the runtime.  In particular,
          when DEBUG is on, we catch multiple ACQUIRE_LOCK()s, and there is
          also an ASSERT_LOCK_HELD() call.
      
      What's missing so far:
      
        - I have almost certainly broken the Win32 build, will fix soon.
      
        - any kind of thread migration or load balancing.  This is high up
          the agenda, though.
      
        - various performance tweaks to do
      
        - throwTo and forkProcess still do not work in SMP mode
      03a9ff01
  11. 12 Sep, 2004 1 commit
  12. 12 Dec, 2001 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2001-12-12 14:31:42 by simonmar] · 55c8be52
      simonmar authored
      - Add a new type of restriction: -hC, which restricts to closures
        whose CCS contains the specified CCs *anywhere* (not just at the
        top).
      
      - Complain if the user tries to request both retainer and biographical
        profiling.  We don't support both simultaneously, because they use
        the same header word in the closure.
      
      - Allow for the fact that the heap might contain some closures which
        don't have a valid retainer set during the heap census.  The only
        known closures of this kind so far are DEAD_WEAK closures.
      
      - Some cruft-removal and renaming of functions to follow conventions.
      55c8be52
  13. 26 Nov, 2001 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2001-11-26 16:54:21 by simonmar] · dbef766c
      simonmar authored
      Profiling cleanup.
      
      This commit eliminates some duplication in the various heap profiling
      subsystems, and generally centralises much of the machinery.  The key
      concept is the separation of a heap *census* (which is now done in one
      place only instead of three) from the calculation of retainer sets.
      Previously the retainer profiling code also did a heap census on the
      fly, and lag-drag-void profiling had its own census machinery.
      
      Value-adds:
      
         - you can now restrict a heap profile to certain retainer sets,
           but still display by cost centre (or type, or closure or
           whatever).
      
         - I've added an option to restrict the maximum retainer set size
           (+RTS -R<size>, defaulting to 8).
      
         - I've cleaned up the heap profiling options at the request of
           Simon PJ.  See the help text for details.  The new scheme
           is backwards compatible with the old.
      
         - I've removed some odd bits of LDV or retainer profiling-specific
           code from various parts of the system.
      
         - the time taken doing heap censuses (and retainer set calculation)
           is now accurately reported by the RTS when you say +RTS -Sstderr.
      
      Still to come:
      
         - restricting a profile to a particular biography
           (lag/drag/void/use).  This requires keeping old heap censuses
           around, but the infrastructure is now in place to do this.
      dbef766c
  14. 22 Nov, 2001 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2001-11-22 14:25:11 by simonmar] · db61851c
      simonmar authored
      Retainer Profiling / Lag-drag-void profiling.
      
      This is mostly work by Sungwoo Park, who spent a summer internship at
      MSR Cambridge this year implementing these two types of heap profiling
      in GHC.
      
      Relative to Sungwoo's original work, I've made some improvements to
      the code:
      
         - it's now possible to apply constraints to retainer and LDV profiles
           in the same way as we do for other types of heap profile (eg.
           +RTS -hc{foo,bar} -hR -RTS gives you a retainer profiling considering
           only closures with cost centres 'foo' and 'bar').
      
         - the heap-profile timer implementation is cleaned up.
      
         - heap profiling no longer has to be run in a two-space heap.
      
         - general cleanup of the code and application of the SDM C coding
           style guidelines.
      
      Profiling will be a little slower and require more space than before,
      mainly because closures have an extra header word to support either
      retainer profiling or LDV profiling (you can't do both at the same
      time).
      
      We've used the new profiling tools on GHC itself, with moderate
      success.  Fixes for some space leaks in GHC to follow...
      db61851c
  15. 15 Sep, 1999 1 commit
  16. 05 Feb, 1999 1 commit
  17. 02 Dec, 1998 1 commit