1. 06 Apr, 2016 1 commit
  2. 29 Mar, 2016 1 commit
    • Joachim Breitner's avatar
      Rename isNopSig to isTopSig · e6e17a09
      Joachim Breitner authored
      to be consistent with the other uses of nop vs. top in Demand.hs. Also,
      stop prettyprinting top strictness signatures in Core dumps.
      e6e17a09
  3. 18 Jan, 2016 1 commit
    • Jan Stolarek's avatar
      Replace calls to `ptext . sLit` with `text` · b8abd852
      Jan Stolarek authored
      Summary:
      In the past the canonical way for constructing an SDoc string literal was the
      composition `ptext . sLit`.  But for some time now we have function `text` that
      does the same.  Plus it has some rules that optimize its runtime behaviour.
      This patch takes all uses of `ptext . sLit` in the compiler and replaces them
      with calls to `text`.  The main benefits of this patch are clener (shorter) code
      and less dependencies between module, because many modules now do not need to
      import `FastString`.  I don't expect any performance benefits - we mostly use
      SDocs to report errors and it seems there is little to be gained here.
      
      Test Plan: ./validate
      
      Reviewers: bgamari, austin, goldfire, hvr, alanz
      
      Subscribers: goldfire, thomie, mpickering
      
      Differential Revision: https://phabricator.haskell.org/D1784
      b8abd852
  4. 13 Jan, 2016 1 commit
  5. 11 Dec, 2015 1 commit
    • eir@cis.upenn.edu's avatar
      Add kind equalities to GHC. · 67465497
      eir@cis.upenn.edu authored
      This implements the ideas originally put forward in
      "System FC with Explicit Kind Equality" (ICFP'13).
      
      There are several noteworthy changes with this patch:
       * We now have casts in types. These change the kind
         of a type. See new constructor `CastTy`.
      
       * All types and all constructors can be promoted.
         This includes GADT constructors. GADT pattern matches
         take place in type family equations. In Core,
         types can now be applied to coercions via the
         `CoercionTy` constructor.
      
       * Coercions can now be heterogeneous, relating types
         of different kinds. A coercion proving `t1 :: k1 ~ t2 :: k2`
         proves both that `t1` and `t2` are the same and also that
         `k1` and `k2` are the same.
      
       * The `Coercion` type has been significantly enhanced.
         The documentation in `docs/core-spec/core-spec.pdf` reflects
         the new reality.
      
       * The type of `*` is now `*`. No more `BOX`.
      
       * Users can write explicit kind variables in their code,
         anywhere they can write type variables. For backward compatibility,
         automatic inference of kind-variable binding is still permitted.
      
       * The new extension `TypeInType` turns on the new user-facing
         features.
      
       * Type families and synonyms are now promoted to kinds. This causes
         trouble with parsing `*`, leading to the somewhat awkward new
         `HsAppsTy` constructor for `HsType`. This is dispatched with in
         the renamer, where the kind `*` can be told apart from a
         type-level multiplication operator. Without `-XTypeInType` the
         old behavior persists. With `-XTypeInType`, you need to import
         `Data.Kind` to get `*`, also known as `Type`.
      
       * The kind-checking algorithms in TcHsType have been significantly
         rewritten to allow for enhanced kinds.
      
       * The new features are still quite experimental and may be in flux.
      
       * TODO: Several open tickets: #11195, #11196, #11197, #11198, #11203.
      
       * TODO: Update user manual.
      
      Tickets addressed: #9017, #9173, #7961, #10524, #8566, #11142.
      Updates Haddock submodule.
      67465497
  6. 10 Oct, 2015 1 commit
  7. 21 Jul, 2015 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Implement -dsuppress-unfoldings · a0e8bb74
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      This extra "suppress" flag helps when there are a lot of Ids
      with big unfoldings that clutter up the dump
      
      Also slightly refactor printing of coercions in Core
      a0e8bb74
  8. 16 Jul, 2015 1 commit
  9. 01 Jun, 2015 1 commit
  10. 18 May, 2015 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Refactor tuple constraints · ffc21506
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      Make tuple constraints be handled by a perfectly ordinary
      type class, with the component constraints being the
      superclasses:
          class (c1, c2) => (c2, c2)
      
      This change was provoked by
      
        #10359  inability to re-use a given tuple
                constraint as a whole
      
        #9858   confusion between term tuples
                and constraint tuples
      
      but it's generally a very nice simplification. We get rid of
       -  In Type, the TuplePred constructor of PredTree,
          and all the code that dealt with TuplePreds
       -  In TcEvidence, the constructors EvTupleMk, EvTupleSel
      
      See Note [How tuples work] in TysWiredIn.
      
      Of course, nothing is ever entirely simple. This one
      proved quite fiddly.
      
      - I did quite a bit of renaming, which makes this patch
        touch a lot of modules. In partiuclar tupleCon -> tupleDataCon.
      
      - I made constraint tuples known-key rather than wired-in.
        This is different to boxed/unboxed tuples, but it proved
        awkward to have all the superclass selectors wired-in.
        Easier just to use the standard mechanims.
      
      - While I was fiddling with known-key names, I split the TH Name
        definitions out of DsMeta into a new module THNames.  That meant
        that the known-key names can all be gathered in PrelInfo, without
        causing module loops.
      
      - I found that the parser was parsing an import item like
            T( .. )
        as a *data constructor* T, and then using setRdrNameSpace to
        fix it.  Stupid!  So I changed the parser to parse a *type
        constructor* T, which means less use of setRdrNameSpace.
      
        I also improved setRdrNameSpace to behave better on Exact Names.
        Largely on priciple; I don't think it matters a lot.
      
      - When compiling a data type declaration for a wired-in thing like
        tuples (,), or lists, we don't really need to look at the
        declaration.  We have the wired-in thing!  And not doing so avoids
        having to line up the uniques for data constructor workers etc.
        See Note [Declarations for wired-in things]
      
      - I found that FunDeps.oclose wasn't taking superclasses into
        account; easily fixed.
      
      - Some error message refactoring for invalid constraints in TcValidity
      
      - Haddock needs to absorb the change too; so there is a submodule update
      ffc21506
  11. 14 May, 2015 1 commit
  12. 13 May, 2015 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Refactor tuple constraints · 130e93aa
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      Make tuple constraints be handled by a perfectly ordinary
      type class, with the component constraints being the
      superclasses:
          class (c1, c2) => (c2, c2)
      
      This change was provoked by
      
        #10359  inability to re-use a given tuple
                constraint as a whole
      
        #9858   confusion between term tuples
                and constraint tuples
      
      but it's generally a very nice simplification. We get rid of
       -  In Type, the TuplePred constructor of PredTree,
          and all the code that dealt with TuplePreds
       -  In TcEvidence, the constructors EvTupleMk, EvTupleSel
      
      See Note [How tuples work] in TysWiredIn.
      
      Of course, nothing is ever entirely simple. This one
      proved quite fiddly.
      
      - I did quite a bit of renaming, which makes this patch
        touch a lot of modules. In partiuclar tupleCon -> tupleDataCon.
      
      - I made constraint tuples known-key rather than wired-in.
        This is different to boxed/unboxed tuples, but it proved
        awkward to have all the superclass selectors wired-in.
        Easier just to use the standard mechanims.
      
      - While I was fiddling with known-key names, I split the TH Name
        definitions out of DsMeta into a new module THNames.  That meant
        that the known-key names can all be gathered in PrelInfo, without
        causing module loops.
      
      - I found that the parser was parsing an import item like
            T( .. )
        as a *data constructor* T, and then using setRdrNameSpace to
        fix it.  Stupid!  So I changed the parser to parse a *type
        constructor* T, which means less use of setRdrNameSpace.
      
        I also improved setRdrNameSpace to behave better on Exact Names.
        Largely on priciple; I don't think it matters a lot.
      
      - When compiling a data type declaration for a wired-in thing like
        tuples (,), or lists, we don't really need to look at the
        declaration.  We have the wired-in thing!  And not doing so avoids
        having to line up the uniques for data constructor workers etc.
        See Note [Declarations for wired-in things]
      
      - I found that FunDeps.oclose wasn't taking superclasses into
        account; easily fixed.
      
      - Some error message refactoring for invalid constraints in TcValidity
      130e93aa
  13. 01 May, 2015 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Refactor TyCon to eliminate TupleTyCon · f6ab0f2d
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      This makes TupleTyCon into an ordinary AlgTyCon, distinguished
      by its AlgTyConRhs, rather than a separate constructor of TyCon.
      
      It is preparatory work for making constraint tuples into classes,
      for which the ConstraintTuple tuples will have a TyConParent
      of a ClassTyCon.  Tuples didn't have this possiblity before.
      
      The patch affects other modules because I eliminated the
      unsatisfactory partial functions tupleTyConBoxity and tupleTyConSort.
      And tupleTyConArity which is just tyConArity.
      f6ab0f2d
  14. 16 Dec, 2014 1 commit
    • Peter Wortmann's avatar
      Source notes (Core support) · 993975d3
      Peter Wortmann authored
      This patch introduces "SourceNote" tickishs that link Core to the
      source code that generated it. The idea is to retain these source code
      links throughout code transformations so we can eventually relate
      object code all the way back to the original source (which we can,
      say, encode as DWARF information to allow debugging).  We generate
      these SourceNotes like other tickshs in the desugaring phase. The
      activating command line flag is "-g", consistent with the flag other
      compilers use to decide DWARF generation.
      
      Keeping ticks from getting into the way of Core transformations is
      tricky, but doable. The changes in this patch produce identical Core
      in all cases I tested -- which at this point is GHC, all libraries and
      nofib. Also note that this pass creates *lots* of tick nodes, which we
      reduce somewhat by removing duplicated and overlapping source
      ticks. This will still cause significant Tick "clumps" - a possible
      future optimization could be to make Tick carry a list of Tickishs
      instead of one at a time.
      
      (From Phabricator D169)
      993975d3
  15. 03 Dec, 2014 1 commit
  16. 28 Aug, 2014 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Refactor unfoldings · 6e0f6ede
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      There are two main refactorings here
      
      1.  Move the uf_arity field
             out of CoreUnfolding
             into UnfWhen
          It's a lot tidier there.  If I've got this right, no behaviour
          should change.
      
      2.  Define specUnfolding and use it in DsBinds and Specialise
           a) commons-up some shared code
           b) makes sure that Specialise correctly specialises DFun
              unfoldings (which it didn't before)
      
      The two got put together because both ended up interacting in the
      specialiser.
      
      They cause zero difference to nofib.
      6e0f6ede
  17. 11 Jun, 2014 1 commit
    • eir@cis.upenn.edu's avatar
      Fix #9062. · e79e2c39
      eir@cis.upenn.edu authored
      Removed (pprEqPred (coercionKind co)) in favor of
      (pprType (coercionType co)).
      
      Also had to make "~R#" a *symbolic* identifier and BuiltInSyntax
      to squelch prefix notation and module prefixes in output. These
      changes are both sensible independent of #9062.
      e79e2c39
  18. 10 Feb, 2014 1 commit
    • Joachim Breitner's avatar
      Implement CallArity analysis · cdceadf3
      Joachim Breitner authored
      This analysis finds out if a let-bound expression with lower manifest
      arity than type arity is always called with more arguments, as in that
      case eta-expansion is allowed and often viable. The analysis is very
      much tailored towards the code generated when foldl is implemented via
      foldr; without this analysis doing so would be a very bad idea!
      
      There are other ways to improve foldr/builder-fusion to cope with foldl,
      if any of these are implemented then this step can probably be moved to
      -O2 to save some compilation times. The current impact of adding this
      phase is just below +2% (measured running GHC's "make").
      cdceadf3
  19. 12 Dec, 2013 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Improve the handling of used-once stuff · 80989de9
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      Joachim and I are committing this onto a branch so that we can share it,
      but we expect to do a bit more work before merging it onto head.
      
      Nofib staus:
        - Most programs, no change
        - A few improve
        - A couple get worse (cacheprof, tak, rfib)
      Investigating the "get worse" set is what's holding up putting this
      on head.
      
      The major issue is this.  Consider
      
          map (f g) ys
      
      where f's demand signature looks like
      
         f :: <L,C1(C1(U))> -> <L,U> -> .
      
      So 'f' is not saturated.  What demand do we place on g?
      Answer
              C(C1(U))
      That is, the inner C1 should stay, even though f is not saturated.
      
      I found that this made a significant difference in the demand signatures
      inferred in GHC.IO, which uses lots of higher-order exception handlers.
      
      I also had to add used-once demand signatures for some of the
      'catch' primops, so that we know their handlers are only called once.
      80989de9
  20. 12 Oct, 2013 1 commit
  21. 02 Sep, 2013 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Remove the final vestiges of InlineWrappers · e4a1d2d0
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      Part of Nick Frisby's patch (c080f727)
      for late demand-analysis removed the over-zealous short-cut whereby
      strictness wrappers were not spelled out in detail in interface files.
      
      This patch completes the process by
       * removing InlineWrapper from UnfoldingSource
       * removing IfWrapper from IfaceUnfolding
      
      There was a tiny bit of special ad-hocery for wrappers, in OccurAnal,
      but fortunately that too turns out to be rendered irrelevant by
      the more uniform treatment, and after that there was no need
      to remember which functions are wrappers.
      e4a1d2d0
  22. 29 Aug, 2013 1 commit
  23. 30 May, 2013 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Make 'SPECIALISE instance' work again · 1ed04090
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      This is a long-standing regression (Trac #7797), which meant that in
      particular the Eq [Char] instance does not get specialised.
      (The *methods* do, but the dictionary itself doesn't.)  So when you
      call a function
           f :: Eq a => blah
      on a string type (ie a=[Char]), 7.6 passes a dictionary of un-specialised
      methods.
      
      This only matters when calling an overloaded function from a
      specialised context, but that does matter in some programs.  I
      remember (though I cannot find the details) that Nick Frisby discovered
      this to be the source of some pretty solid performanc regresisons.
      
      Anyway it works now. The key change is that a DFunUnfolding now takes
      a form that is both simpler than before (the DFunArg type is eliminated)
      and more general:
      
      data Unfolding
        = ...
        | DFunUnfolding {     -- The Unfolding of a DFunId
          			-- See Note [DFun unfoldings]
            		  	--     df = /\a1..am. \d1..dn. MkD t1 .. tk
                              --                                 (op1 a1..am d1..dn)
           		      	--     	    	      	       	   (op2 a1..am d1..dn)
              df_bndrs :: [Var],      -- The bound variables [a1..m],[d1..dn]
              df_con   :: DataCon,    -- The dictionary data constructor (never a newtype datacon)
              df_args  :: [CoreExpr]  -- Args of the data con: types, superclasses and methods,
          }                           -- in positional order
      
      That in turn allowed me to re-enable the DFunUnfolding specialisation in
      DsBinds.  Lots of details here in TcInstDcls:
      	  Note [SPECIALISE instance pragmas]
      
      I also did some refactoring, in particular to pass the InScopeSet to
      exprIsConApp_maybe (which in turn means it has to go to a RuleFun).
      
      NB: Interface file format has changed!
      1ed04090
  24. 13 Feb, 2013 1 commit
  25. 24 Jan, 2013 1 commit
  26. 17 Jan, 2013 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Major patch to implement the new Demand Analyser · 0831a12e
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      This patch is the result of Ilya Sergey's internship at MSR.  It
      constitutes a thorough overhaul and simplification of the demand
      analyser.  It makes a solid foundation on which we can now build.
      Main changes are
      
      * Instead of having one combined type for Demand, a Demand is
         now a pair (JointDmd) of
            - a StrDmd and
            - an AbsDmd.
         This allows strictness and absence to be though about quite
         orthogonally, and greatly reduces brain melt-down.
      
      * Similarly in the DmdResult type, it's a pair of
           - a PureResult (indicating only divergence/non-divergence)
           - a CPRResult (which deals only with the CPR property
      
      * In IdInfo, the
          strictnessInfo field contains a StrictSig, not a Maybe StrictSig
          demandInfo     field contains a Demand, not a Maybe Demand
        We don't need Nothing (to indicate no strictness/demand info)
        any more; topSig/topDmd will do.
      
      * Remove "boxity" analysis entirely.  This was an attempt to
        avoid "reboxing", but it added complexity, is extremely
        ad-hoc, and makes very little difference in practice.
      
      * Remove the "unboxing strategy" computation. This was an an
        attempt to ensure that a worker didn't get zillions of
        arguments by unboxing big tuples.  But in fact removing it
        DRAMATICALLY reduces allocation in an inner loop of the
        I/O library (where the threshold argument-count had been
        set just too low).  It's exceptional to have a zillion arguments
        and I don't think it's worth the complexity, especially since
        it turned out to have a serious performance hit.
      
      * Remove quite a bit of ad-hoc cruft
      
      * Move worthSplittingFun, worthSplittingThunk from WorkWrap to
        Demand. This allows JointDmd to be fully abstract, examined
        only inside Demand.
      
      Everything else really follows from these changes.
      
      All of this is really just refactoring, so we don't expect
      big performance changes, but acutally the numbers look quite
      good.  Here is a full nofib run with some highlights identified:
      
              Program           Size    Allocs   Runtime   Elapsed  TotalMem
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
               expert          -2.6%    -15.5%      0.00      0.00     +0.0%
                fluid          -2.4%     -7.1%      0.01      0.01     +0.0%
                   gg          -2.5%    -28.9%      0.02      0.02    -33.3%
            integrate          -2.6%     +3.2%     +2.6%     +2.6%     +0.0%
              mandel2          -2.6%     +4.2%      0.01      0.01     +0.0%
             nucleic2          -2.0%    -16.3%      0.11      0.11     +0.0%
                 para          -2.6%    -20.0%    -11.8%    -11.7%     +0.0%
               parser          -2.5%    -17.9%      0.05      0.05     +0.0%
               prolog          -2.6%    -13.0%      0.00      0.00     +0.0%
               puzzle          -2.6%     +2.2%     +0.8%     +0.8%     +0.0%
              sorting          -2.6%    -35.9%      0.00      0.00     +0.0%
             treejoin          -2.6%    -52.2%     -9.8%     -9.9%     +0.0%
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Min          -2.7%    -52.2%    -11.8%    -11.7%    -33.3%
                  Max          -1.8%     +4.2%    +10.5%    +10.5%     +7.7%
       Geometric Mean          -2.5%     -2.8%     -0.4%     -0.5%     -0.4%
      
      Things to note
      
      * Binary sizes are smaller. I don't know why, but it's good.
      
      * Allocation is sometiemes a *lot* smaller. I believe that all the big numbers
        (I checked treejoin, gg, sorting) arise from one place, namely a function
        GHC.IO.Encoding.UTF8.utf8_decode, which is strict in two Buffers both of
        which have several arugments.  Not w/w'ing both arguments (which is what
        we did before) has a big effect.  So the big win in actually somewhat
        accidental, gained by removing the "unboxing strategy" code.
      
      * A couple of benchmarks allocate slightly more.  This turns out
        to be due to reboxing (integrate).  But the biggest increase is
        mandel2, and *that* turned out also to be a somewhat accidental
        loss of CSE, and pointed the way to doing better CSE: see Trac
        #7596.
      
      * Runtimes are never very reliable, but seem to improve very slightly.
      
      All in all, a good piece of work.  Thank you Ilya!
      0831a12e
  27. 05 Dec, 2012 1 commit
  28. 16 Oct, 2012 1 commit
    • ian@well-typed.com's avatar
      Some alpha renaming · cd33eefd
      ian@well-typed.com authored
      Mostly d -> g (matching DynFlag -> GeneralFlag).
      Also renamed if* to when*, matching the Haskell if/when names
      cd33eefd
  29. 09 Oct, 2012 1 commit
  30. 15 Jul, 2012 1 commit
  31. 27 Jun, 2012 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Add silent superclass parameters (again) · aa1e0976
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      Silent superclass parameters solve the problem that
      the superclasses of a dicionary construction can easily
      turn out to be (wrongly) bottom.  The problem and solution
      are described in
         Note [Silent superclass arguments] in TcInstDcls
      
      I first implemented this fix (with Dimitrios) in Dec 2010, but removed
      it again in Jun 2011 becuase we thought it wasn't necessary any
      more. (The reason we thought it wasn't necessary is that we'd stopped
      generating derived superclass constraints for *wanteds*.  But we were
      wrong; that didn't solve the superclass-loop problem.)
      
      So we have to re-implement it.  It's not hard.  Main features:
      
        * The IdDetails for a DFunId says how many silent arguments it has
      
        * A DFunUnfolding describes which dictionary args are
          just parameters (DFunLamArg) and which are a function to apply
          to the parameters (DFunPolyArg).  This adds the DFunArg type
          to CoreSyn
      
        * Consequential changes to IfaceSyn.  (Binary hi file format changes
          slightly.)
      
        * TcInstDcls changes to generate the right dfuns
      
        * CoreSubst.exprIsConApp_maybe handles the new DFunUnfolding
      
      The thing taht is *not* done yet is to alter the vectoriser to
      pass the relevant extra argument when building a PA dictionary.
      aa1e0976
  32. 14 Jun, 2012 2 commits
  33. 09 May, 2012 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Be a little less aggressive about inlining (fixes Trac #5623) · 2112f43c
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      When inlining, we are making a copy of the expression, so we have to
      be careful about duplicating work.  Previously we were using
      exprIsCheap for that, but it is willing to duplicate a cheap primop --
      and that is terribly bad if it happens inside some inner array loop
      (Trac #5623).  So now we use a new function exprIsWorkFree.  Even
      then there is some wiggle room:
         see Note [exprIsWorkFree] in CoreUtils
      
      This commit does make wheel-sieve1 allocate a lot more, but we decided
      that's just tough; it's more important for inlining to be robust
      about not duplicating work.
      2112f43c
  34. 02 Mar, 2012 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Hurrah! This major commit adds support for scoped kind variables, · 3bf54e78
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      which (finally) fills out the functionality of polymorphic kinds.
      It also fixes numerous bugs.
      
      Main changes are:
      
      Renaming stuff
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      * New type in HsTypes:
           data HsBndrSig sig = HsBSig sig [Name]
        which is used for type signatures in patterns, and kind signatures
        in types.  So when you say
             f (x :: [a]) = x ++ x
        or
             data T (f :: k -> *) (x :: *) = MkT (f x)
        the signatures in both cases are a HsBndrSig.
      
      * The [Name] in HsBndrSig records the variables bound by the
        pattern, that is 'a' in the first example, 'k' in the second,
        and nothing in the third.  The renamer initialises the field.
      
      * As a result I was able to get rid of
           RnHsSyn.extractHsTyNames :: LHsType Name -> NameSet
        and its friends altogether.  Deleted the entire module!
        This led to some knock-on refactoring; in particular the
        type renamer now returns the free variables just like the
        term renamer.
      
      Kind-checking types: mainly TcHsType
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      A major change is that instead of kind-checking types in two
      passes, we now do one. Under the old scheme, the first pass did
      kind-checking and (hackily) annotated the HsType with the
      inferred kinds; and the second pass desugared the HsType to a
      Type.  But now that we have kind variables inside types, the
      first pass (TcHsType.tc_hs_type) can go straight to Type, and
      zonking will squeeze out any kind unification variables later.
      
      This is much nicer, but it was much more fiddly than I had expected.
      
      The nastiest corner is this: it's very important that tc_hs_type
      uses lazy constructors to build the returned type. See
      Note [Zonking inside the knot] in TcHsType.
      
      Type-checking type and class declarations: mainly TcTyClsDecls
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      I did tons of refactoring in TcTyClsDecls.  Simpler and nicer now.
      
      Typechecking bindings: mainly TcBinds
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      I rejigged (yet again) the handling of type signatures in TcBinds.
      It's a bit simpler now.  The main change is that tcTySigs goes
      right through to a TcSigInfo in one step; previously it was split
      into two, part here and part later.
      
      Unsafe coercions
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Usually equality coercions have exactly the same kind on both
      sides.  But we do allow an *unsafe* coercion between Int# and Bool,
      say, used in
          case error Bool "flah" of { True -> 3#; False -> 0# }
      -->
          (error Bool "flah") |> unsafeCoerce Bool Int#
      
      So what is the instantiation of (~#) here?
         unsafeCoerce Bool Int# :: (~#) ??? Bool Int#
      I'm using OpenKind here for now, but it's un-satisfying that
      the lhs and rhs of the ~ don't have precisely the same kind.
      
      More minor
      ~~~~~~~~~~
      * HsDecl.TySynonym has its free variables attached, which makes
        the cycle computation in TcTyDecls.mkSynEdges easier.
      
      * Fixed a nasty reversed-comparison bug in FamInstEnv:
        @@ -490,7 +490,7 @@ lookup_fam_inst_env' match_fun one_sided ie fam tys
           n_tys = length tys
           extra_tys = drop arity tys
           (match_tys, add_extra_tys)
      -       | arity > n_tys = (take arity tys, \res_tys -> res_tys ++ extra_tys)
      +       | arity < n_tys = (take arity tys, \res_tys -> res_tys ++ extra_tys)
              | otherwise     = (tys,            \res_tys -> res_tys)
      3bf54e78
  35. 19 Dec, 2011 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Tidy up pretty-printing for variables · c492e50b
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      We already have a class OutputableBndr; this patch adds
      methods pprInfixOcc and pprPrefixOcc, so that we can get
      rid of the hideous hack (the old) Outputable.pprHsVar.
      
      The hack was exposed by Trac #5657, which is thereby fixed.
      c492e50b
  36. 25 Nov, 2011 1 commit
  37. 11 Nov, 2011 1 commit
    • dreixel's avatar
      New kind-polymorphic core · 09015be8
      dreixel authored
      This big patch implements a kind-polymorphic core for GHC. The current
      implementation focuses on making sure that all kind-monomorphic programs still
      work in the new core; it is not yet guaranteed that kind-polymorphic programs
      (using the new -XPolyKinds flag) will work.
      
      For more information, see http://haskell.org/haskellwiki/GHC/Kinds
      09015be8
  38. 04 Nov, 2011 1 commit
  39. 02 Nov, 2011 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Overhaul of infrastructure for profiling, coverage (HPC) and breakpoints · 7bb0447d
      Simon Marlow authored
      User visible changes
      ====================
      
      Profilng
      --------
      
      Flags renamed (the old ones are still accepted for now):
      
        OLD            NEW
        ---------      ------------
        -auto-all      -fprof-auto
        -auto          -fprof-exported
        -caf-all       -fprof-cafs
      
      New flags:
      
        -fprof-auto              Annotates all bindings (not just top-level
                                 ones) with SCCs
      
        -fprof-top               Annotates just top-level bindings with SCCs
      
        -fprof-exported          Annotates just exported bindings with SCCs
      
        -fprof-no-count-entries  Do not maintain entry counts when profiling
                                 (can make profiled code go faster; useful with
                                 heap profiling where entry counts are not used)
      
      Cost-centre stacks have a new semantics, which should in most cases
      result in more useful and intuitive profiles.  If you find this not to
      be the case, please let me know.  This is the area where I have been
      experimenting most, and the current solution is probably not the
      final version, however it does address all the outstanding bugs and
      seems to be better than GHC 7.2.
      
      Stack traces
      ------------
      
      +RTS -xc now gives more information.  If the exception originates from
      a CAF (as is common, because GHC tends to lift exceptions out to the
      top-level), then the RTS walks up the stack and reports the stack in
      the enclosing update frame(s).
      
      Result: +RTS -xc is much more useful now - but you still have to
      compile for profiling to get it.  I've played around a little with
      adding 'head []' to GHC itself, and +RTS -xc does pinpoint the problem
      quite accurately.
      
      I plan to add more facilities for stack tracing (e.g. in GHCi) in the
      future.
      
      Coverage (HPC)
      --------------
      
       * derived instances are now coloured yellow if they weren't used
       * likewise record field names
       * entry counts are more accurate (hpc --fun-entry-count)
       * tab width is now correct (markup was previously off in source with
         tabs)
      
      Internal changes
      ================
      
      In Core, the Note constructor has been replaced by
      
              Tick (Tickish b) (Expr b)
      
      which is used to represent all the kinds of source annotation we
      support: profiling SCCs, HPC ticks, and GHCi breakpoints.
      
      Depending on the properties of the Tickish, different transformations
      apply to Tick.  See CoreUtils.mkTick for details.
      
      Tickets
      =======
      
      This commit closes the following tickets, test cases to follow:
      
        - Close #2552: not a bug, but the behaviour is now more intuitive
          (test is T2552)
      
        - Close #680 (test is T680)
      
        - Close #1531 (test is result001)
      
        - Close #949 (test is T949)
      
        - Close #2466: test case has bitrotted (doesn't compile against current
          version of vector-space package)
      7bb0447d