1. 23 Jul, 2012 3 commits
  2. 04 Apr, 2012 1 commit
  3. 16 Feb, 2012 1 commit
  4. 07 Jan, 2012 1 commit
  5. 05 Dec, 2011 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Allow full constraint solving under a for-all (Trac #5595) · 2e6dcdf7
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      The main idea is that when we unify
          forall a. t1  ~  forall a. t2
      we get constraints from unifying t1~t2 that mention a.
      We are producing a coercion witnessing the equivalence of
      the for-alls, and inside *that* coercion we need bindings
      for the solved constraints arising from t1~t2.
      
      We didn't have way to do this before.  The big change is
      that here's a new type TcEvidence.TcCoercion, which is
      much like Coercion.Coercion except that there's a slot
      for TcEvBinds in it.
      
      This has a wave of follow-on changes. Not deep but broad.
      
      * New module TcEvidence, which now contains the HsWrapper
        TcEvBinds, EvTerm etc types that used to be in HsBinds
      
      * The typechecker works exclusively in terms of TcCoercion.
      
      * The desugarer converts TcCoercion to Coercion
      
      * The main payload is in TcUnify.unifySigmaTy. This is the
        function that had a gross hack before, but is now beautiful.
      
      * LCoercion is gone!  Hooray.
      
      Many many fiddly changes in conssequence.  But it's nice.
      2e6dcdf7
  6. 28 Nov, 2011 1 commit
    • dimitris's avatar
      This patch includes: · f3183d9a
      dimitris authored
      0) Typo in panic message.
      1) prioritization of equalities over family equalities in the worklists.
      2) rewriting of inert substitutions and solveds on-the-spot instead of
         kicking them out in the inerts. This required a monadic map over
         substitutions hence the modifications in UniqFM.
      3) Just comments and removing stale commented code.
      
      4) Useful SCC for simplifyInfer.
      
      5) Making CoreStats outputable.
      f3183d9a
  7. 25 Nov, 2011 1 commit
  8. 16 Nov, 2011 1 commit
  9. 11 Nov, 2011 1 commit
    • dreixel's avatar
      New kind-polymorphic core · 09015be8
      dreixel authored
      This big patch implements a kind-polymorphic core for GHC. The current
      implementation focuses on making sure that all kind-monomorphic programs still
      work in the new core; it is not yet guaranteed that kind-polymorphic programs
      (using the new -XPolyKinds flag) will work.
      
      For more information, see http://haskell.org/haskellwiki/GHC/Kinds
      09015be8
  10. 05 Nov, 2011 1 commit
    • GregWeber's avatar
      addDependentFile #4900 · b994313a
      GregWeber authored
      Let GHC know about an external dependency that Template Haskell uses
      so that GHC can recompile when the dependency changes.
      No support for ghc -M
      
      There is a corresponding addition to the template-haskell library
      b994313a
  11. 04 Nov, 2011 1 commit
  12. 02 Nov, 2011 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Overhaul of infrastructure for profiling, coverage (HPC) and breakpoints · 7bb0447d
      Simon Marlow authored
      User visible changes
      ====================
      
      Profilng
      --------
      
      Flags renamed (the old ones are still accepted for now):
      
        OLD            NEW
        ---------      ------------
        -auto-all      -fprof-auto
        -auto          -fprof-exported
        -caf-all       -fprof-cafs
      
      New flags:
      
        -fprof-auto              Annotates all bindings (not just top-level
                                 ones) with SCCs
      
        -fprof-top               Annotates just top-level bindings with SCCs
      
        -fprof-exported          Annotates just exported bindings with SCCs
      
        -fprof-no-count-entries  Do not maintain entry counts when profiling
                                 (can make profiled code go faster; useful with
                                 heap profiling where entry counts are not used)
      
      Cost-centre stacks have a new semantics, which should in most cases
      result in more useful and intuitive profiles.  If you find this not to
      be the case, please let me know.  This is the area where I have been
      experimenting most, and the current solution is probably not the
      final version, however it does address all the outstanding bugs and
      seems to be better than GHC 7.2.
      
      Stack traces
      ------------
      
      +RTS -xc now gives more information.  If the exception originates from
      a CAF (as is common, because GHC tends to lift exceptions out to the
      top-level), then the RTS walks up the stack and reports the stack in
      the enclosing update frame(s).
      
      Result: +RTS -xc is much more useful now - but you still have to
      compile for profiling to get it.  I've played around a little with
      adding 'head []' to GHC itself, and +RTS -xc does pinpoint the problem
      quite accurately.
      
      I plan to add more facilities for stack tracing (e.g. in GHCi) in the
      future.
      
      Coverage (HPC)
      --------------
      
       * derived instances are now coloured yellow if they weren't used
       * likewise record field names
       * entry counts are more accurate (hpc --fun-entry-count)
       * tab width is now correct (markup was previously off in source with
         tabs)
      
      Internal changes
      ================
      
      In Core, the Note constructor has been replaced by
      
              Tick (Tickish b) (Expr b)
      
      which is used to represent all the kinds of source annotation we
      support: profiling SCCs, HPC ticks, and GHCi breakpoints.
      
      Depending on the properties of the Tickish, different transformations
      apply to Tick.  See CoreUtils.mkTick for details.
      
      Tickets
      =======
      
      This commit closes the following tickets, test cases to follow:
      
        - Close #2552: not a bug, but the behaviour is now more intuitive
          (test is T2552)
      
        - Close #680 (test is T680)
      
        - Close #1531 (test is result001)
      
        - Close #949 (test is T949)
      
        - Close #2466: test case has bitrotted (doesn't compile against current
          version of vector-space package)
      7bb0447d
  13. 31 Oct, 2011 1 commit
  14. 10 Oct, 2011 1 commit
  15. 02 Oct, 2011 1 commit
  16. 21 Sep, 2011 2 commits
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      94e7c6bf
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Add support for all top-level declarations to GHCi · 3db75724
      Simon Marlow authored
        This is work mostly done by Daniel Winograd-Cort during his
        internship at MSR Cambridge, with some further refactoring by me.
      
      This commit adds support to GHCi for most top-level declarations that
      can be used in Haskell source files.  Class, data, newtype, type,
      instance are all supported, as are Type Family-related declarations.
      
      The current set of declarations are shown by :show bindings.  As with
      variable bindings, entities bound by newer declarations shadow earlier
      ones.
      
      Tests are in testsuite/tests/ghci/scripts/ghci039--ghci054.
      Documentation to follow.
      3db75724
  17. 06 Sep, 2011 1 commit
    • batterseapower's avatar
      Implement -XConstraintKind · 9729fe7c
      batterseapower authored
      Basically as documented in http://hackage.haskell.org/trac/ghc/wiki/KindFact,
      this patch adds a new kind Constraint such that:
      
        Show :: * -> Constraint
        (?x::Int) :: Constraint
        (Int ~ a) :: Constraint
      
      And you can write *any* type with kind Constraint to the left of (=>):
      even if that type is a type synonym, type variable, indexed type or so on.
      
      The following (somewhat related) changes are also made:
       1. We now box equality evidence. This is required because we want
          to give (Int ~ a) the *lifted* kind Constraint
       2. For similar reasons, implicit parameters can now only be of
          a lifted kind. (?x::Int#) => ty is now ruled out
       3. Implicit parameter constraints are now allowed in superclasses
          and instance contexts (this just falls out as OK with the new
          constraint solver)
      
      Internally the following major changes were made:
       1. There is now no PredTy in the Type data type. Instead
          GHC checks the kind of a type to figure out if it is a predicate
       2. There is now no AClass TyThing: we represent classes as TyThings
          just as a ATyCon (classes had TyCons anyway)
       3. What used to be (~) is now pretty-printed as (~#). The box
          constructor EqBox :: (a ~# b) -> (a ~ b)
       4. The type LCoercion is used internally in the constraint solver
          and type checker to represent coercions with free variables
          of type (a ~ b) rather than (a ~# b)
      9729fe7c
  18. 18 Aug, 2011 1 commit
  19. 21 Jul, 2011 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Simplify the treatment of RULES in OccurAnal · f88b20f4
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      I realised that my recently-added cunning stuff about
      RULES for imported Ids was simply wrong, so this patch
      removes it.   See Note [Rules for imported functions],
      which explains it all.
      
      This patch also does quite a bit of refactoring in
      the treatment of loop breakers.
      f88b20f4
  20. 20 Jul, 2011 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Fix #481: use a safe recompilation check when Template Haskell is · 48bc81ad
      Simon Marlow authored
      being used.
      
      We now track whether a module used any TH splices in the ModIface (and
      at compile time in the TcGblEnv and ModGuts).  If a module used TH
      splices last time it was compiled, then we ignore the results of the
      normal recompilation check and recompile anyway, *unless* the module
      is "stable" - that is, none of its dependencies (direct or indirect)
      have changed.  The stability test is pretty important - otherwise ghc
      --make would always recompile TH modules even if nothing at all had
      changed, but it does require some extra plumbing to get this
      information from GhcMake into HscMain.
      
      test in driver/recomp009
      48bc81ad
  21. 14 Jul, 2011 2 commits
  22. 30 Jun, 2011 1 commit
  23. 13 Jun, 2011 2 commits
  24. 10 Jun, 2011 1 commit
  25. 19 Apr, 2011 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      This BIG PATCH contains most of the work for the New Coercion Representation · fdf86568
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      See the paper "Practical aspects of evidence based compilation in System FC"
      
      * Coercion becomes a data type, distinct from Type
      
      * Coercions become value-level things, rather than type-level things,
        (although the value is zero bits wide, like the State token)
        A consequence is that a coerion abstraction increases the arity by 1
        (just like a dictionary abstraction)
      
      * There is a new constructor in CoreExpr, namely Coercion, to inject
        coercions into terms
      fdf86568
  26. 12 Apr, 2011 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Change the way module initialisation is done (#3252, #4417) · a52ff761
      Simon Marlow authored
      Previously the code generator generated small code fragments labelled
      with __stginit_M for each module M, and these performed whatever
      initialisation was necessary for that module and recursively invoked
      the initialisation functions for imported modules.  This appraoch had
      drawbacks:
      
       - FFI users had to call hs_add_root() to ensure the correct
         initialisation routines were called.  This is a non-standard,
         and ugly, API.
      
       - unless we were using -split-objs, the __stginit dependencies would
         entail linking the whole transitive closure of modules imported,
         whether they were actually used or not.  In an extreme case (#4387,
         #4417), a module from GHC might be imported for use in Template
         Haskell or an annotation, and that would force the whole of GHC to
         be needlessly linked into the final executable.
      
      So now instead we do our initialisation with C functions marked with
      __attribute__((constructor)), which are automatically invoked at
      program startup time (or DSO load-time).  The C initialisers are
      emitted into the stub.c file.  This means that every time we compile
      with -prof or -hpc, we now get a stub file, but thanks to #3687 that
      is now invisible to the user.
      
      There are some refactorings in the RTS (particularly for HPC) to
      handle the fact that initialisers now get run earlier than they did
      before.
      
      The __stginit symbols are still generated, and the hs_add_root()
      function still exists (but does nothing), for backwards compatibility.
      a52ff761
  27. 02 Dec, 2010 1 commit
  28. 20 Feb, 2011 1 commit
    • chak@cse.unsw.edu.au.'s avatar
      Added a VECTORISE pragma · f2aaae97
      chak@cse.unsw.edu.au. authored
      - Added a pragma {-# VECTORISE var = exp #-} that prevents
        the vectoriser from vectorising the definition of 'var'.
        Instead it uses the binding '$v_var = exp' to vectorise
        'var'.  The vectoriser checks that the Core type of 'exp'
        matches the vectorised Core type of 'var'.  (It would be
        quite complicated to perform that check in the type checker
        as the vectorisation of a type needs the state of the VM
        monad.)
      - Added parts of a related VECTORISE SCALAR pragma
      - Documented -ddump-vect
      - Added -ddump-vt-trace
      - Some clean up
      f2aaae97
  29. 16 Nov, 2010 1 commit
  30. 21 Oct, 2010 1 commit
  31. 07 Oct, 2010 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Implement auto-specialisation of imported Ids · 92267aa2
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      This big-ish patch arranges that if an Id 'f' is 
        * Type-class overloaded 
             f :: Ord a => [a] -> [a]
        * Defined with an INLINABLE pragma
             {-# INLINABLE f #-}
        * Exported from its defining module 'D'
      
      then in any module 'U' that imports D
      
      1. Any call of 'f' at a fixed type will generate 
         (a) a specialised version of f in U
         (b) a RULE that rewrites unspecialised calls to the
             specialised on
      
        e.g. if the call is (f Int dOrdInt xs) then the 
        specialiser will generate
           $sfInt :: [Int] -> [Int]
           $sfInt = <code for f, imported from D, specialised>
           {-# RULE forall d.  f Int d = $sfInt #-}
      
      2. In addition, you can give an explicit {-# SPECIALISE -#}
         pragma for the imported Id
           {-# SPECIALISE f :: [Bool] -> [Bool] #-}
         This too generates a local specialised definition, 
         and the corresponding RULE 
      
      The new RULES are exported from module 'U', so that any module
      importing U will see the specialised versions of 'f', and will
      not re-specialise them.
      
      There's a flag -fwarn-auto-orphan that warns you if the auto-generated
      RULES are orphan rules. It's not in -Wall, mainly to avoid lots of
      error messages with existing packages.
      
      Main implementation changes
      
       - A new flag on a CoreRule to say if it was auto-generated.
         This is persisted across interface files, so there's a small
         change in interface file format.
      
       - Quite a bit of fiddling with plumbing, to get the 
         {-# SPECIALISE #-} pragmas for imported Ids.  In particular, a
         new field tgc_imp_specs in TcGblEnv, to keep the specialise
         pragmas for imported Ids between the typechecker and the desugarer.
      
       - Some new code (although surprisingly little) in Specialise,
         to deal with calls of imported Ids
      92267aa2
  32. 13 Sep, 2010 1 commit
  33. 24 Dec, 2009 1 commit
  34. 05 Nov, 2009 1 commit
  35. 29 Oct, 2009 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      The Big INLINE Patch: totally reorganise way that INLINE pragmas work · 72462499
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      This patch has been a long time in gestation and has, as a
      result, accumulated some extra bits and bobs that are only
      loosely related.  I separated the bits that are easy to split
      off, but the rest comes as one big patch, I'm afraid.
      
      Note that:
       * It comes together with a patch to the 'base' library
       * Interface file formats change slightly, so you need to
         recompile all libraries
      
      The patch is mainly giant tidy-up, driven in part by the
      particular stresses of the Data Parallel Haskell project. I don't
      expect a big performance win for random programs.  Still, here are the
      nofib results, relative to the state of affairs without the patch
      
              Program           Size    Allocs   Runtime   Elapsed
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Min         -12.7%    -14.5%    -17.5%    -17.8%
                  Max          +4.7%    +10.9%     +9.1%     +8.4%
       Geometric Mean          +0.9%     -0.1%     -5.6%     -7.3%
      
      The +10.9% allocation outlier is rewrite, which happens to have a
      very delicate optimisation opportunity involving an interaction
      of CSE and inlining (see nofib/Simon-nofib-notes). The fact that
      the 'before' case found the optimisation is somewhat accidental.
      Runtimes seem to go down, but I never kno wwhether to really trust
      this number.  Binary sizes wobble a bit, but nothing drastic.
      
      
      The Main Ideas are as follows.
      
      InlineRules
      ~~~~~~~~~~~
      When you say 
            {-# INLINE f #-}
            f x = <rhs>
      you intend that calls (f e) are replaced by <rhs>[e/x] So we
      should capture (\x.<rhs>) in the Unfolding of 'f', and never meddle
      with it.  Meanwhile, we can optimise <rhs> to our heart's content,
      leaving the original unfolding intact in Unfolding of 'f'.
      
      So the representation of an Unfolding has changed quite a bit
      (see CoreSyn).  An INLINE pragma gives rise to an InlineRule 
      unfolding.  
      
      Moreover, it's only used when 'f' is applied to the
      specified number of arguments; that is, the number of argument on 
      the LHS of the '=' sign in the original source definition. 
      For example, (.) is now defined in the libraries like this
         {-# INLINE (.) #-}
         (.) f g = \x -> f (g x)
      so that it'll inline when applied to two arguments. If 'x' appeared
      on the left, thus
         (.) f g x = f (g x)
      it'd only inline when applied to three arguments.  This slightly-experimental
      change was requested by Roman, but it seems to make sense.
      
      Other associated changes
      
      * Moving the deck chairs in DsBinds, which processes the INLINE pragmas
      
      * In the old system an INLINE pragma made the RHS look like
         (Note InlineMe <rhs>)
        The Note switched off optimisation in <rhs>.  But it was quite
        fragile in corner cases. The new system is more robust, I believe.
        In any case, the InlineMe note has disappeared 
      
      * The workerInfo of an Id has also been combined into its Unfolding,
        so it's no longer a separate field of the IdInfo.
      
      * Many changes in CoreUnfold, esp in callSiteInline, which is the critical
        function that decides which function to inline.  Lots of comments added!
      
      * exprIsConApp_maybe has moved to CoreUnfold, since it's so strongly
        associated with "does this expression unfold to a constructor application".
        It can now do some limited beta reduction too, which Roman found 
        was an important.
      
      Instance declarations
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      It's always been tricky to get the dfuns generated from instance
      declarations to work out well.  This is particularly important in 
      the Data Parallel Haskell project, and I'm now on my fourth attempt,
      more or less.
      
      There is a detailed description in TcInstDcls, particularly in
      Note [How instance declarations are translated].   Roughly speaking
      we now generate a top-level helper function for every method definition
      in an instance declaration, so that the dfun takes a particularly
      stylised form:
        dfun a d1 d2 = MkD (op1 a d1 d2) (op2 a d1 d2) ...etc...
      
      In fact, it's *so* stylised that we never need to unfold a dfun.
      Instead ClassOps have a special rewrite rule that allows us to
      short-cut dictionary selection.  Suppose dfun :: Ord a -> Ord [a]
                                                  d :: Ord a
      Then   
          compare (dfun a d)  -->   compare_list a d 
      in one rewrite, without first inlining the 'compare' selector
      and the body of the dfun.
      
      To support this
      a) ClassOps have a BuiltInRule (see MkId.dictSelRule)
      b) DFuns have a special form of unfolding (CoreSyn.DFunUnfolding)
         which is exploited in CoreUnfold.exprIsConApp_maybe
      
      Implmenting all this required a root-and-branch rework of TcInstDcls
      and bits of TcClassDcl.
      
      
      Default methods
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      If you give an INLINE pragma to a default method, it should be just
      as if you'd written out that code in each instance declaration, including
      the INLINE pragma.  I think that it now *is* so.  As a result, library
      code can be simpler; less duplication.
      
      
      The CONLIKE pragma
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      In the DPH project, Roman found cases where he had
      
         p n k = let x = replicate n k
                 in ...(f x)...(g x)....
      
         {-# RULE f (replicate x) = f_rep x #-}
      
      Normally the RULE would not fire, because doing so involves 
      (in effect) duplicating the redex (replicate n k).  A new
      experimental modifier to the INLINE pragma, {-# INLINE CONLIKE
      replicate #-}, allows you to tell GHC to be prepared to duplicate
      a call of this function if it allows a RULE to fire.
      
      See Note [CONLIKE pragma] in BasicTypes
      
      
      Join points
      ~~~~~~~~~~~
      See Note [Case binders and join points] in Simplify
      
      
      Other refactoring
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      * I moved endPass from CoreLint to CoreMonad, with associated jigglings
      
      * Better pretty-printing of Core
      
      * The top-level RULES (ones that are not rules for locally-defined things)
        are now substituted on every simplifier iteration.  I'm not sure how
        we got away without doing this before.  This entails a bit more plumbing
        in SimplCore.
      
      * The necessary stuff to serialise and deserialise the new
        info across interface files.
      
      * Something about bottoming floats in SetLevels
            Note [Bottoming floats]
      
      * substUnfolding has moved from SimplEnv to CoreSubs, where it belongs
      
      
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Program           Size    Allocs   Runtime   Elapsed
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 anna          +2.4%     -0.5%      0.16      0.17
                 ansi          +2.6%     -0.1%      0.00      0.00
                 atom          -3.8%     -0.0%     -1.0%     -2.5%
               awards          +3.0%     +0.7%      0.00      0.00
               banner          +3.3%     -0.0%      0.00      0.00
           bernouilli          +2.7%     +0.0%     -4.6%     -6.9%
                boyer          +2.6%     +0.0%      0.06      0.07
               boyer2          +4.4%     +0.2%      0.01      0.01
                 bspt          +3.2%     +9.6%      0.02      0.02
            cacheprof          +1.4%     -1.0%    -12.2%    -13.6%
             calendar          +2.7%     -1.7%      0.00      0.00
             cichelli          +3.7%     -0.0%      0.13      0.14
              circsim          +3.3%     +0.0%     -2.3%     -9.9%
             clausify          +2.7%     +0.0%      0.05      0.06
        comp_lab_zift          +2.6%     -0.3%     -7.2%     -7.9%
             compress          +3.3%     +0.0%     -8.5%     -9.6%
            compress2          +3.6%     +0.0%    -15.1%    -17.8%
          constraints          +2.7%     -0.6%    -10.0%    -10.7%
         cryptarithm1          +4.5%     +0.0%     -4.7%     -5.7%
         cryptarithm2          +4.3%    -14.5%      0.02      0.02
                  cse          +4.4%     -0.0%      0.00      0.00
                eliza          +2.8%     -0.1%      0.00      0.00
                event          +2.6%     -0.0%     -4.9%     -4.4%
               exp3_8          +2.8%     +0.0%     -4.5%     -9.5%
               expert          +2.7%     +0.3%      0.00      0.00
                  fem          -2.0%     +0.6%      0.04      0.04
                  fft          -6.0%     +1.8%      0.05      0.06
                 fft2          -4.8%     +2.7%      0.13      0.14
             fibheaps          +2.6%     -0.6%      0.05      0.05
                 fish          +4.1%     +0.0%      0.03      0.04
                fluid          -2.1%     -0.2%      0.01      0.01
               fulsom          -4.8%     +9.2%     +9.1%     +8.4%
               gamteb          -7.1%     -1.3%      0.10      0.11
                  gcd          +2.7%     +0.0%      0.05      0.05
          gen_regexps          +3.9%     -0.0%      0.00      0.00
               genfft          +2.7%     -0.1%      0.05      0.06
                   gg          -2.7%     -0.1%      0.02      0.02
                 grep          +3.2%     -0.0%      0.00      0.00
               hidden          -0.5%     +0.0%    -11.9%    -13.3%
                  hpg          -3.0%     -1.8%     +0.0%     -2.4%
                  ida          +2.6%     -1.2%      0.17     -9.0%
                infer          +1.7%     -0.8%      0.08      0.09
              integer          +2.5%     -0.0%     -2.6%     -2.2%
            integrate          -5.0%     +0.0%     -1.3%     -2.9%
              knights          +4.3%     -1.5%      0.01      0.01
                 lcss          +2.5%     -0.1%     -7.5%     -9.4%
                 life          +4.2%     +0.0%     -3.1%     -3.3%
                 lift          +2.4%     -3.2%      0.00      0.00
            listcompr          +4.0%     -1.6%      0.16      0.17
             listcopy          +4.0%     -1.4%      0.17      0.18
             maillist          +4.1%     +0.1%      0.09      0.14
               mandel          +2.9%     +0.0%      0.11      0.12
              mandel2          +4.7%     +0.0%      0.01      0.01
              minimax          +3.8%     -0.0%      0.00      0.00
              mkhprog          +3.2%     -4.2%      0.00      0.00
           multiplier          +2.5%     -0.4%     +0.7%     -1.3%
             nucleic2          -9.3%     +0.0%      0.10      0.10
                 para          +2.9%     +0.1%     -0.7%     -1.2%
            paraffins         -10.4%     +0.0%      0.20     -1.9%
               parser          +3.1%     -0.0%      0.05      0.05
              parstof          +1.9%     -0.0%      0.00      0.01
                  pic          -2.8%     -0.8%      0.01      0.02
                power          +2.1%     +0.1%     -8.5%     -9.0%
               pretty         -12.7%     +0.1%      0.00      0.00
               primes          +2.8%     +0.0%      0.11      0.11
            primetest          +2.5%     -0.0%     -2.1%     -3.1%
               prolog          +3.2%     -7.2%      0.00      0.00
               puzzle          +4.1%     +0.0%     -3.5%     -8.0%
               queens          +2.8%     +0.0%      0.03      0.03
              reptile          +2.2%     -2.2%      0.02      0.02
              rewrite          +3.1%    +10.9%      0.03      0.03
                 rfib          -5.2%     +0.2%      0.03      0.03
                  rsa          +2.6%     +0.0%      0.05      0.06
                  scc          +4.6%     +0.4%      0.00      0.00
                sched          +2.7%     +0.1%      0.03      0.03
                  scs          -2.6%     -0.9%     -9.6%    -11.6%
               simple          -4.0%     +0.4%    -14.6%    -14.9%
                solid          -5.6%     -0.6%     -9.3%    -14.3%
              sorting          +3.8%     +0.0%      0.00      0.00
               sphere          -3.6%     +8.5%      0.15      0.16
               symalg          -1.3%     +0.2%      0.03      0.03
                  tak          +2.7%     +0.0%      0.02      0.02
            transform          +2.0%     -2.9%     -8.0%     -8.8%
             treejoin          +3.1%     +0.0%    -17.5%    -17.8%
            typecheck          +2.9%     -0.3%     -4.6%     -6.6%
              veritas          +3.9%     -0.3%      0.00      0.00
                 wang          -6.2%     +0.0%      0.18     -9.8%
            wave4main         -10.3%     +2.6%     -2.1%     -2.3%
         wheel-sieve1          +2.7%     -0.0%     +0.3%     -0.6%
         wheel-sieve2          +2.7%     +0.0%     -3.7%     -7.5%
                 x2n1          -4.1%     +0.1%      0.03      0.04
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Min         -12.7%    -14.5%    -17.5%    -17.8%
                  Max          +4.7%    +10.9%     +9.1%     +8.4%
       Geometric Mean          +0.9%     -0.1%     -5.6%     -7.3%
      72462499