1. 01 Apr, 2010 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Remove the IND_OLDGEN and IND_OLDGEN_PERM closure types · 70a2431f
      Simon Marlow authored
      These are no longer used: once upon a time they used to have different
      layout from IND and IND_PERM respectively, but that is no longer the
      case since we changed the remembered set to be an array of addresses
      instead of a linked list of closures.
      70a2431f
  2. 29 Mar, 2010 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      New implementation of BLACKHOLEs · 5d52d9b6
      Simon Marlow authored
      This replaces the global blackhole_queue with a clever scheme that
      enables us to queue up blocked threads on the closure that they are
      blocked on, while still avoiding atomic instructions in the common
      case.
      
      Advantages:
      
       - gets rid of a locked global data structure and some tricky GC code
         (replacing it with some per-thread data structures and different
         tricky GC code :)
      
       - wakeups are more prompt: parallel/concurrent performance should
         benefit.  I haven't seen anything dramatic in the parallel
         benchmarks so far, but a couple of threading benchmarks do improve
         a bit.
      
       - waking up a thread blocked on a blackhole is now O(1) (e.g. if
         it is the target of throwTo).
      
       - less sharing and better separation of Capabilities: communication
         is done with messages, the data structures are strictly owned by a
         Capability and cannot be modified except by sending messages.
      
       - this change will utlimately enable us to do more intelligent
         scheduling when threads block on each other.  This is what started
         off the whole thing, but it isn't done yet (#3838).
      
      I'll be documenting all this on the wiki in due course.
      5d52d9b6
  3. 11 Mar, 2010 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Use message-passing to implement throwTo in the RTS · 7408b392
      Simon Marlow authored
      This replaces some complicated locking schemes with message-passing
      in the implementation of throwTo. The benefits are
      
       - previously it was impossible to guarantee that a throwTo from
         a thread running on one CPU to a thread running on another CPU
         would be noticed, and we had to rely on the GC to pick up these
         forgotten exceptions. This no longer happens.
      
       - the locking regime is simpler (though the code is about the same
         size)
      
       - threads can be unblocked from a blocked_exceptions queue without
         having to traverse the whole queue now.  It's a rare case, but
         replaces an O(n) operation with an O(1).
      
       - generally we move in the direction of sharing less between
         Capabilities (aka HECs), which will become important with other
         changes we have planned.
      
      Also in this patch I replaced several STM-specific closure types with
      a generic MUT_PRIM closure type, which allowed a lot of code in the GC
      and other places to go away, hence the line-count reduction.  The
      message-passing changes resulted in about a net zero line-count
      difference.
      7408b392
  4. 03 Dec, 2009 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      GC refactoring, remove "steps" · 214b3663
      Simon Marlow authored
      The GC had a two-level structure, G generations each of T steps.
      Steps are for aging within a generation, mostly to avoid premature
      promotion.  
      
      Measurements show that more than 2 steps is almost never worthwhile,
      and 1 step is usually worse than 2.  In theory fractional steps are
      possible, so the ideal number of steps is somewhere between 1 and 3.
      GHC's default has always been 2.
      
      We can implement 2 steps quite straightforwardly by having each block
      point to the generation to which objects in that block should be
      promoted, so blocks in the nursery point to generation 0, and blocks
      in gen 0 point to gen 1, and so on.
      
      This commit removes the explicit step structures, merging generations
      with steps, thus simplifying a lot of code.  Performance is
      unaffected.  The tunable number of steps is now gone, although it may
      be replaced in the future by a way to tune the aging in generation 0.
      214b3663
  5. 01 Dec, 2009 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Make allocatePinned use local storage, and other refactorings · 5270423a
      Simon Marlow authored
      This is a batch of refactoring to remove some of the GC's global
      state, as we move towards CPU-local GC.  
      
        - allocateLocal() now allocates large objects into the local
          nursery, rather than taking a global lock and allocating
          then in gen 0 step 0.
      
        - allocatePinned() was still allocating from global storage and
          taking a lock each time, now it uses local storage. 
          (mallocForeignPtrBytes should be faster with -threaded).
          
        - We had a gen 0 step 0, distinct from the nurseries, which are
          stored in a separate nurseries[] array.  This is slightly strange.
          I removed the g0s0 global that pointed to gen 0 step 0, and
          removed all uses of it.  I think now we don't use gen 0 step 0 at
          all, except possibly when there is only one generation.  Possibly
          more tidying up is needed here.
      
        - I removed the global allocate() function, and renamed
          allocateLocal() to allocate().
      
        - the alloc_blocks global is gone.  MAYBE_GC() and
          doYouWantToGC() now check the local nursery only.
      5270423a
  6. 05 Aug, 2009 1 commit
  7. 03 Aug, 2009 1 commit
  8. 02 Aug, 2009 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      RTS tidyup sweep, first phase · a2a67cd5
      Simon Marlow authored
      The first phase of this tidyup is focussed on the header files, and in
      particular making sure we are exposinng publicly exactly what we need
      to, and no more.
      
       - Rts.h now includes everything that the RTS exposes publicly,
         rather than a random subset of it.
      
       - Most of the public header files have moved into subdirectories, and
         many of them have been renamed.  But clients should not need to
         include any of the other headers directly, just #include the main
         public headers: Rts.h, HsFFI.h, RtsAPI.h.
      
       - All the headers needed for via-C compilation have moved into the
         stg subdirectory, which is self-contained.  Most of the headers for
         the rest of the RTS APIs have moved into the rts subdirectory.
      
       - I left MachDeps.h where it is, because it is so widely used in
         Haskell code.
       
       - I left a deprecated stub for RtsFlags.h in place.  The flag
         structures are now exposed by Rts.h.
      
       - Various internal APIs are no longer exposed by public header files.
      
       - Various bits of dead code and declarations have been removed
      
       - More gcc warnings are turned on, and the RTS code is more
         warning-clean.
      
       - More source files #include "PosixSource.h", and hence only use
         standard POSIX (1003.1c-1995) interfaces.
      
      There is a lot more tidying up still to do, this is just the first
      pass.  I also intend to standardise the names for external RTS APIs
      (e.g use the rts_ prefix consistently), and declare the internal APIs
      as hidden for shared libraries.
      a2a67cd5
  9. 18 Nov, 2008 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Add optional eager black-holing, with new flag -feager-blackholing · d600bf7a
      Simon Marlow authored
      Eager blackholing can improve parallel performance by reducing the
      chances that two threads perform the same computation.  However, it
      has a cost: one extra memory write per thunk entry.  
      
      To get the best results, any code which may be executed in parallel
      should be compiled with eager blackholing turned on.  But since
      there's a cost for sequential code, we make it optional and turn it on
      for the parallel package only.  It might be a good idea to compile
      applications (or modules) with parallel code in with
      -feager-blackholing.
      
      ToDo: document -feager-blackholing.
      d600bf7a
  10. 03 Oct, 2008 1 commit
  11. 19 Jun, 2008 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Fix up inlines for gcc 4.3 · 24ad9cf0
      Simon Marlow authored
      gcc 4.3 emits warnings for static inline functions that its heuristics
      decided not to inline.  The workaround is to either mark appropriate
      functions as "hot" (a new attribute in gcc 4.3), or sometimes to use
      "extern inline" instead.
      
      With this fix I can validate with gcc 4.3 on Fedora 9.
      24ad9cf0
  12. 12 Oct, 2007 1 commit
  13. 11 Oct, 2007 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Add a proper write barrier for MVars · 1ed01a87
      Simon Marlow authored
      Previously MVars were always on the mutable list of the old
      generation, which meant every MVar was visited during every minor GC.
      With lots of MVars hanging around, this gets expensive.  We addressed
      this problem for MUT_VARs (aka IORefs) a while ago, the solution is to
      use a traditional GC write-barrier when the object is modified.  This
      patch does the same thing for MVars.
      
      TVars are still done the old way, they could probably benefit from the
      same treatment too.
      1ed01a87
  14. 16 Aug, 2007 1 commit
  15. 20 Jun, 2007 1 commit
  16. 13 Jun, 2007 2 commits
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      FIX #1418 (partially) · 23e5985c
      Simon Marlow authored
      When the con_desc field of an info table was made into a relative
      reference, this had the side effect of making the profiling fields
      (closure_desc and closure_type) also relative, but only when compiling
      via C, and the heap profiler was still treating them as absolute,
      leading to crashes when profiling with -hd or -hy.
      
      This patch fixes up the story to be consistent: these fields really
      should be relative (otherwise we couldn't make shared versions of the
      profiling libraries), so I've made them relative and fixed up the RTS
      to know about this.
      23e5985c
  17. 08 May, 2007 3 commits
  18. 27 Apr, 2007 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Basic heap profile support without -prof · cbeb99ef
      Simon Marlow authored
      Now that constructor info tables contain the name of the constructor,
      we can generate useful heap profiles without requiring the whole
      program and libraries to be compiled with -prof.  So now, "+RTS -hT"
      generates a heap profile for any program, dividing the profile by
      constructor.  It wouldn't be hard to add support for grouping
      constructors by module, or to restrict the profile to certain
      constructors/modules/packages.
      
      This means that for the first time we can get heap profiles for GHCi,
      which was previously impossible because the byte-code
      interpreter and linker don't work with -prof.
      cbeb99ef
  19. 28 Feb, 2007 1 commit
  20. 15 Dec, 2006 1 commit
  21. 15 Nov, 2006 1 commit
  22. 29 Sep, 2006 2 commits
    • ravi@bluespec.com's avatar
      hp_slash_fix · 3cdb0ada
      ravi@bluespec.com authored
      Fix output of cost-centre stacks so that the slashes appear in the correct place
      
      Please include this patch in the 6.6 branch as well as HEAD
      3cdb0ada
    • ravi@bluespec.com's avatar
      rts_ccs_length · 16871485
      ravi@bluespec.com authored
      Add the -L RTS flag to control the length of the cost-centre stacks reported in 
      a heap profile.
      
      Please include this change in the 6.6 branch as well as HEAD
       
      16871485
  23. 07 Oct, 2006 1 commit
  24. 11 Sep, 2006 1 commit
  25. 07 Sep, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Remove CONSTR_CHARLIKE and CONSTR_INTLIKE closure types · a0be7e7c
      Simon Marlow authored
      These closure types aren't used/needed, as far as I can tell.  The
      commoning up of Chars/Ints happens by comparing info pointers, and
      the info table for a dynamic C#/I# is CONSTR_0_1.  The RTS seemed
      a little confused about whether CONSTR_CHARLIKE/CONSTR_INTLIKE were
      supposed to be static or dynamic closures, too.
      a0be7e7c
  26. 07 Apr, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Reorganisation of the source tree · 0065d5ab
      Simon Marlow authored
      Most of the other users of the fptools build system have migrated to
      Cabal, and with the move to darcs we can now flatten the source tree
      without losing history, so here goes.
      
      The main change is that the ghc/ subdir is gone, and most of what it
      contained is now at the top level.  The build system now makes no
      pretense at being multi-project, it is just the GHC build system.
      
      No doubt this will break many things, and there will be a period of
      instability while we fix the dependencies.  A straightforward build
      should work, but I haven't yet fixed binary/source distributions.
      Changes to the Building Guide will follow, too.
      0065d5ab
  27. 23 Feb, 2006 1 commit
  28. 08 Feb, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      make the smp way RTS-only, normal libraries now work with -smp · beb5737b
      Simon Marlow authored
      We had to bite the bullet here and add an extra word to every thunk,
      to enable running ordinary libraries on SMP.  Otherwise, we would have
      needed to ship an extra set of libraries with GHC 6.6 in addition to
      the two sets we already ship (normal + profiled), and all Cabal
      packages would have to be compiled for SMP too.  We decided it best
      just to take the hit now, making SMP easily accessible to everyone in
      GHC 6.6.
      
      Incedentally, although this increases allocation by around 12% on
      average, the performance hit is around 5%, and much less if your inner
      loop doesn't use any laziness.
      beb5737b
  29. 30 Jan, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      fix bug #664 in printSample() · a0f8de19
      Simon Marlow authored
      printSample() was attempting to round the fractional part of the time,
      but not propagated to the non-fractional part.  It's probably better not
      to attempt to round the time at all.
      a0f8de19
  30. 18 Jan, 2006 1 commit
  31. 17 Jan, 2006 2 commits
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2006-01-17 16:13:18 by simonmar] · 91b07216
      simonmar authored
      Improve the GC behaviour of IORefs (see Ticket #650).
      
      This is a small change to the way IORefs interact with the GC, which
      should improve GC performance for programs with plenty of IORefs.
      
      Previously we had a single closure type for mutable variables,
      MUT_VAR.  Mutable variables were *always* on the mutable list in older
      generations, and always traversed on every GC.
      
      Now, we have two closure types: MUT_VAR_CLEAN and MUT_VAR_DIRTY.  The
      latter is on the mutable list, but the former is not.  (NB. this
      differs from MUT_ARR_PTRS_CLEAN and MUT_ARR_PTRS_DIRTY, both of which
      are on the mutable list).  writeMutVar# now implements a write
      barrier, by calling dirty_MUT_VAR() in the runtime, that does the
      necessary modification of MUT_VAR_CLEAN into MUT_VAR_DIRY, and adding
      to the mutable list if necessary.
      
      This results in some pretty dramatic speedups for GHC itself.  I've
      just measureed a 30% overall speedup compiling a 31-module program
      (anna) with the default heap settings :-D
      91b07216
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2006-01-17 16:03:47 by simonmar] · da69fa9c
      simonmar authored
      Improve the GC behaviour of IOArrays/STArrays
      
      See Ticket #650
      
      This is a small change to the way mutable arrays interact with the GC,
      that can have a dramatic effect on performance, and make tricks with
      unsafeThaw/unsafeFreeze redundant.  Data.HashTable should be faster
      now (I haven't measured it yet).
      
      We now have two mutable array closure types, MUT_ARR_PTRS_CLEAN and
      MUT_ARR_PTRS_DIRTY.  Both are on the mutable list if the array is in
      an old generation.  writeArray# sets the type to MUT_ARR_PTRS_DIRTY.
      The garbage collector can set the type to MUT_ARR_PTRS_CLEAN if it
      finds that no element of the array points into a younger generation
      (discovering this required a small addition to evacuate(), but rough
      tests indicate that it doesn't measurably affect performance).
      
      NOTE: none of this affects unboxed arrays (IOUArray/STUArray), only
      boxed arrays (IOArray/STArray).
      
      We could go further and extend the DIRTY bit to be per-block rather
      than for the whole array, but for now this is an easy improvement.
      da69fa9c
  32. 21 Oct, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-10-21 14:02:17 by simonmar] · 03a9ff01
      simonmar authored
      Big re-hash of the threaded/SMP runtime
      
      This is a significant reworking of the threaded and SMP parts of
      the runtime.  There are two overall goals here:
      
        - To push down the scheduler lock, reducing contention and allowing
          more parts of the system to run without locks.  In particular,
          the scheduler does not require a lock any more in the common case.
      
        - To improve affinity, so that running Haskell threads stick to the
          same OS threads as much as possible.
      
      At this point we have the basic structure working, but there are some
      pieces missing.  I believe it's reasonably stable - the important
      parts of the testsuite pass in all the (normal,threaded,SMP) ways.
      
      In more detail:
      
        - Each capability now has a run queue, instead of one global run
          queue.  The Capability and Task APIs have been completely
          rewritten; see Capability.h and Task.h for the details.
      
        - Each capability has its own pool of worker Tasks.  Hence, Haskell
          threads on a Capability's run queue will run on the same worker
          Task(s).  As long as the OS is doing something reasonable, this
          should mean they usually stick to the same CPU.  Another way to
          look at this is that we're assuming each Capability is associated
          with a fixed CPU.
      
        - What used to be StgMainThread is now part of the Task structure.
          Every OS thread in the runtime has an associated Task, and it
          can ask for its current Task at any time with myTask().
      
        - removed RTS_SUPPORTS_THREADS symbol, use THREADED_RTS instead
          (it is now defined for SMP too).
      
        - The RtsAPI has had to change; we must explicitly pass a Capability
          around now.  The previous interface assumed some global state.
          SchedAPI has also changed a lot.
      
        - The OSThreads API now supports thread-local storage, used to
          implement myTask(), although it could be done more efficiently
          using gcc's __thread extension when available.
      
        - I've moved some POSIX-specific stuff into the posix subdirectory,
          moving in the direction of separating out platform-specific
          implementations.
      
        - lots of lock-debugging and assertions in the runtime.  In particular,
          when DEBUG is on, we catch multiple ACQUIRE_LOCK()s, and there is
          also an ASSERT_LOCK_HELD() call.
      
      What's missing so far:
      
        - I have almost certainly broken the Win32 build, will fix soon.
      
        - any kind of thread migration or load balancing.  This is high up
          the agenda, though.
      
        - various performance tweaks to do
      
        - throwTo and forkProcess still do not work in SMP mode
      03a9ff01
  33. 14 Oct, 2005 1 commit
  34. 16 Sep, 2005 1 commit
  35. 26 Jul, 2005 1 commit