1. 19 Jan, 2012 1 commit
    • Ian Lynagh's avatar
      Fix validate · 8bdcc5cf
      Ian Lynagh authored
      This patch defines a flag -fno-warn-pointless-pragmas, and uses it to
      disable some warnings in the containers package.
      
      Along the way, also made a ContainsDynFlags class, and added a
      HasDynFlags instance for IOEnv (and thus TcRnIf and DsM).
      8bdcc5cf
  2. 25 Oct, 2011 1 commit
  3. 16 Aug, 2009 1 commit
  4. 01 Jul, 2009 1 commit
  5. 24 May, 2009 1 commit
  6. 06 Nov, 2008 1 commit
  7. 30 Oct, 2008 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Add (a) CoreM monad, (b) new Annotations feature · 9bcd95ba
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      This patch, written by Max Bolingbroke,  does two things
      
      1.  It adds a new CoreM monad (defined in simplCore/CoreMonad),
          which is used as the top-level monad for all the Core-to-Core
          transformations (starting at SimplCore).  It supports
             * I/O (for debug printing)
             * Unique supply
             * Statistics gathering
             * Access to the HscEnv, RuleBase, Annotations, Module
          The patch therefore refactors the top "skin" of every Core-to-Core
          pass, but does not change their functionality.
      
      2.  It adds a completely new facility to GHC: Core "annotations".
          The idea is that you can say
             {#- ANN foo (Just "Hello") #-}
          which adds the annotation (Just "Hello") to the top level function
          foo.  These annotations can be looked up in any Core-to-Core pass,
          and are persisted into interface files.  (Hence a Core-to-Core pass
          can also query the annotations of imported things.)  Furthermore,
          a Core-to-Core pass can add new annotations (eg strictness info)
          of its own, which can be queried by importing modules.
      
      The design of the annotation system is somewhat in flux.  It's
      designed to work with the (upcoming) dynamic plug-ins mechanism,
      but is meanwhile independently useful.
      
      Do not merge to 6.10!  
      9bcd95ba
  8. 03 Oct, 2008 2 commits
  9. 26 Sep, 2008 1 commit
    • pepe's avatar
      Don't capture error calls in tryUser · ec197dfe
      pepe authored
      A previous patch slightly changed the semantics of tryUser.
      This patch restores the original behaviour
      (as expected in :print)
      ec197dfe
  10. 31 Jul, 2008 1 commit
  11. 20 Jul, 2008 1 commit
  12. 18 Feb, 2008 2 commits
  13. 17 Jan, 2008 4 commits
  14. 27 Oct, 2007 1 commit
  15. 10 Oct, 2007 1 commit
  16. 21 Sep, 2007 1 commit
  17. 04 Sep, 2007 1 commit
  18. 03 Sep, 2007 1 commit
  19. 01 Sep, 2007 1 commit
  20. 22 Mar, 2007 1 commit
  21. 11 Oct, 2006 2 commits
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Module header tidyup #2 · 046ee54f
      Simon Marlow authored
      Push this further along, and fix build problems in the first patch.
      046ee54f
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Interface file optimisation and removal of nameParent · b00b5bc0
      Simon Marlow authored
      This large commit combines several interrelated changes:
      
        - IfaceSyn now contains actual Names rather than the special
          IfaceExtName type.  The binary interface file contains
          a symbol table of Names, where each entry is a (package,
          ModuleName, OccName) triple.  Names in the IfaceSyn point
          to entries in the symbol table.
      
          This reduces the size of interface files, which should
          hopefully improve performance (not measured yet).
      
          The toIfaceXXX functions now do not need to pass around
          a function from Name -> IfaceExtName, which makes that
          code simpler.
      
        - Names now do not point directly to their parents, and the
          nameParent operation has gone away.  It turned out to be hard to
          keep this information consistent in practice, and the parent info
          was only valid in some Names.  Instead we made the following
          changes:
      
          * ImportAvails contains a new field 
                imp_parent :: NameEnv AvailInfo
            which gives the family info for any Name in scope, and
            is used by the renamer when renaming export lists, amongst
            other things.  This info is thrown away after renaming.
      
          * The mi_ver_fn field of ModIface now maps to
            (OccName,Version) instead of just Version, where the
            OccName is the parent name.  This mapping is used when
            constructing the usage info for dependent modules.
            There may be entries in mi_ver_fn for things that are not in
            scope, whereas imp_parent only deals with in-scope things.
      
          * The md_exports field of ModDetails now contains
            [AvailInfo] rather than NameSet.  This gives us
            family info for the exported names of a module.
      
      Also:
      
         - ifaceDeclSubBinders moved to IfaceSyn (seems like the
           right place for it).
      
         - heavily refactored renaming of import/export lists.
      
         - Unfortunately external core is now broken, as it relied on
           IfaceSyn.  It requires some attention.
      b00b5bc0
  22. 07 Apr, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Reorganisation of the source tree · 0065d5ab
      Simon Marlow authored
      Most of the other users of the fptools build system have migrated to
      Cabal, and with the move to darcs we can now flatten the source tree
      without losing history, so here goes.
      
      The main change is that the ghc/ subdir is gone, and most of what it
      contained is now at the top level.  The build system now makes no
      pretense at being multi-project, it is just the GHC build system.
      
      No doubt this will break many things, and there will be a period of
      instability while we fix the dependencies.  A straightforward build
      should work, but I haven't yet fixed binary/source distributions.
      Changes to the Building Guide will follow, too.
      0065d5ab
  23. 25 Jan, 2006 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Simon's big boxy-type commit · ac10f840
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      This very large commit adds impredicativity to GHC, plus
      numerous other small things.
        
      *** WARNING: I have compiled all the libraries, and
      ***	     a stage-2 compiler, and everything seems
      ***	     fine.  But don't grab this patch if you 
      ***	     can't tolerate a hiccup if something is
      ***	     broken.
        
      The big picture is this:
      
      a) GHC handles impredicative polymorphism, as described in the
         "Boxy types: type inference for higher-rank types and
         impredicativity" paper
      
      b) GHC handles GADTs in the new simplified (and very sligtly less
         epxrssive) way described in the
         "Simple unification-based type inference for GADTs" paper
      
        
      But there are lots of smaller changes, and since it was pre-Darcs
      they are not individually recorded.
        
      Some things to watch out for:
        
      c)   The story on lexically-scoped type variables has changed, as per
           my email.  I append the story below for completeness, but I 
           am still not happy with it, and it may change again.  In particular,
           the new story does not allow a pattern-bound scoped type variable
           to be wobbly, so (\(x::[a]) -> ...) is usually rejected.  This is
           more restrictive than before, and we might loosen up again.
        
      d)   A consequence of adding impredicativity is that GHC is a bit less
           gung ho about converting automatically between
        	(ty1 -> forall a. ty2)    and    (forall a. ty1 -> ty2)
           In particular, you may need to eta-expand some functions to make
           typechecking work again.
         
           Furthermore, functions are now invariant in their argument types,
           rather than being contravariant.  Again, the main consequence is
           that you may occasionally need to eta-expand function arguments when
           using higher-rank polymorphism.
        
      
      Please test, and let me know of any hiccups
      
      
      Scoped type variables in GHC
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      	January 2006
      
      0) Terminology.
         
         A *pattern binding* is of the form
      	pat = rhs
      
         A *function binding* is of the form
      	f pat1 .. patn = rhs
      
         A binding of the formm
      	var = rhs
         is treated as a (degenerate) *function binding*.
      
      
         A *declaration type signature* is a separate type signature for a
         let-bound or where-bound variable:
      	f :: Int -> Int
      
         A *pattern type signature* is a signature in a pattern: 
      	\(x::a) -> x
      	f (x::a) = x
      
         A *result type signature* is a signature on the result of a
         function definition:
      	f :: forall a. [a] -> a
      	head (x:xs) :: a = x
      
         The form
      	x :: a = rhs
         is treated as a (degnerate) function binding with a result
         type signature, not as a pattern binding.
      
      1) The main invariants:
      
           A) A lexically-scoped type variable always names a (rigid)
       	type variable (not an arbitrary type).  THIS IS A CHANGE.
              Previously, a scoped type variable named an arbitrary *type*.
      
           B) A type signature always describes a rigid type (since
      	its free (scoped) type variables name rigid type variables).
      	This is also a change, a consequence of (A).
      
           C) Distinct lexically-scoped type variables name distinct
      	rigid type variables.  This choice is open; 
      
      2) Scoping
      
      2(a) If a declaration type signature has an explicit forall, those type
         variables are brought into scope in the right hand side of the 
         corresponding binding (plus, for function bindings, the patterns on
         the LHS).  
      	f :: forall a. a -> [a]
      	f (x::a) = [x :: a, x]
         Both occurences of 'a' in the second line are bound by 
         the 'forall a' in the first line
      
         A declaration type signature *without* an explicit top-level forall
         is implicitly quantified over all the type variables that are
         mentioned in the type but not already in scope.  GHC's current
         rule is that this implicit quantification does *not* bring into scope
         any new scoped type variables.
      	f :: a -> a
      	f x = ...('a' is not in scope here)...
         This gives compatibility with Haskell 98
      
      2(b) A pattern type signature implicitly brings into scope any type
         variables mentioned in the type that are not already into scope.
         These are called *pattern-bound type variables*.
      	g :: a -> a -> [a]
      	g (x::a) (y::a) = [y :: a, x]
         The pattern type signature (x::a) brings 'a' into scope.
         The 'a' in the pattern (y::a) is bound, as is the occurrence on 
         the RHS.  
      
         A pattern type siganture is the only way you can bring existentials 
         into scope.
      	data T where
      	  MkT :: forall a. a -> (a->Int) -> T
      
      	f x = case x of
      		MkT (x::a) f -> f (x::a)
      
      2a) QUESTION
      	class C a where
      	  op :: forall b. b->a->a
      
      	instance C (T p q) where
      	  op = <rhs>
          Clearly p,q are in scope in <rhs>, but is 'b'?  Not at the moment.
          Nor can you add a type signature for op in the instance decl.
          You'd have to say this:
      	instance C (T p q) where
      	  op = let op' :: forall b. ...
      	           op' = <rhs>
      	       in op'
      
      3) A pattern-bound type variable is allowed only if the pattern's
         expected type is rigid.  Otherwise we don't know exactly *which*
         skolem the scoped type variable should be bound to, and that means
         we can't do GADT refinement.  This is invariant (A), and it is a 
         big change from the current situation.
      
      	f (x::a) = x	-- NO; pattern type is wobbly
      	
      	g1 :: b -> b
      	g1 (x::b) = x	-- YES, because the pattern type is rigid
      
      	g2 :: b -> b
      	g2 (x::c) = x	-- YES, same reason
      
      	h :: forall b. b -> b
      	h (x::b) = x	-- YES, but the inner b is bound
      
      	k :: forall b. b -> b
      	k (x::c) = x	-- NO, it can't be both b and c
      
      3a) You cannot give different names for the same type variable in the same scope
          (Invariant (C)):
      
      	f1 :: p -> p -> p		-- NO; because 'a' and 'b' would be
      	f1 (x::a) (y::b) = (x::a)	--     bound to the same type variable
      
      	f2 :: p -> p -> p		-- OK; 'a' is bound to the type variable
      	f2 (x::a) (y::a) = (x::a)	--     over which f2 is quantified
      					-- NB: 'p' is not lexically scoped
      
      	f3 :: forall p. p -> p -> p	-- NO: 'p' is now scoped, and is bound to
      	f3 (x::a) (y::a) = (x::a)	--     to the same type varialble as 'a'
      
      	f4 :: forall p. p -> p -> p	-- OK: 'p' is now scoped, and its occurences
      	f4 (x::p) (y::p) = (x::p)	--     in the patterns are bound by the forall
      
      
      3b) You can give a different name to the same type variable in different
          disjoint scopes, just as you can (if you want) give diferent names to 
          the same value parameter
      
      	g :: a -> Bool -> Maybe a
      	g (x::p) True  = Just x  :: Maybe p
      	g (y::q) False = Nothing :: Maybe q
      
      3c) Scoped type variables respect alpha renaming. For example, 
          function f2 from (3a) above could also be written:
      	f2' :: p -> p -> p
      	f2' (x::b) (y::b) = x::b
         where the scoped type variable is called 'b' instead of 'a'.
      
      
      4) Result type signatures obey the same rules as pattern types signatures.
         In particular, they can bind a type variable only if the result type is rigid
      
      	f x :: a = x	-- NO
      
      	g :: b -> b
      	g x :: b = x	-- YES; binds b in rhs
      
      5) A *pattern type signature* in a *pattern binding* cannot bind a 
         scoped type variable
      
      	(x::a, y) = ...		-- Legal only if 'a' is already in scope
      
         Reason: in type checking, the "expected type" of the LHS pattern is
         always wobbly, so we can't bind a rigid type variable.  (The exception
         would be for an existential type variable, but existentials are not
         allowed in pattern bindings either.)
       
         Even this is illegal
      	f :: forall a. a -> a
      	f x = let ((y::b)::a, z) = ... 
      	      in 
         Here it looks as if 'b' might get a rigid binding; but you can't bind
         it to the same skolem as a.
      
      6) Explicitly-forall'd type variables in the *declaration type signature(s)*
         for a *pattern binding* do not scope AT ALL.
      
      	x :: forall a. a->a	  -- NO; the forall a does 
      	Just (x::a->a) = Just id  --     not scope at all
      
      	y :: forall a. a->a
      	Just y = Just (id :: a->a)  -- NO; same reason
      
         THIS IS A CHANGE, but one I bet that very few people will notice.
         Here's why:
      
      	strange :: forall b. (b->b,b->b)
      	strange = (id,id)
      
      	x1 :: forall a. a->a
      	y1 :: forall b. b->b
      	(x1,y1) = strange
      
          This is legal Haskell 98 (modulo the forall). If both 'a' and 'b'
          both scoped over the RHS, they'd get unified and so cannot stand
          for distinct type variables. One could *imagine* allowing this:
         
      	x2 :: forall a. a->a
      	y2 :: forall a. a->a
      	(x2,y2) = strange
      
          using the very same type variable 'a' in both signatures, so that
          a single 'a' scopes over the RHS.  That seems defensible, but odd,
          because though there are two type signatures, they introduce just
          *one* scoped type variable, a.
      
      7) Possible extension.  We might consider allowing
      	\(x :: [ _ ]) -> <expr>
          where "_" is a wild card, to mean "x has type list of something", without
          naming the something.
      ac10f840
  24. 19 Jul, 2005 1 commit
    • simonpj's avatar
      [project @ 2005-07-19 16:44:50 by simonpj] · a7ecdf96
      simonpj authored
      WARNING: this is a big commit.  You might want 
      	to wait a few days before updating, in case I've 
      	broken something.
      
      	However, if any of the changes are what you wanted,
      	please check it out and test!
      
      This commit does three main things:
      
      1. A re-organisation of the way that GHC handles bindings in HsSyn.
         This has been a bit of a mess for quite a while.  The key new
         types are
      
      	-- Bindings for a let or where clause
      	data HsLocalBinds id
      	  = HsValBinds (HsValBinds id)
      	  | HsIPBinds  (HsIPBinds id)
      	  | EmptyLocalBinds
      
      	-- Value bindings (not implicit parameters)
      	data HsValBinds id
      	  = ValBindsIn  -- Before typechecking
      		(LHsBinds id) [LSig id]	-- Not dependency analysed
      					-- Recursive by default
      
      	  | ValBindsOut	-- After typechecking
      		[(RecFlag, LHsBinds id)]-- Dependency analysed
      
      2. Implement Mark Jones's idea of increasing polymoprhism
         by using type signatures to cut the strongly-connected components
         of a recursive group.  As a consequence, GHC no longer insists
         on the contexts of the type signatures of a recursive group
         being identical.
      
         This drove a significant change: the renamer no longer does dependency
         analysis.  Instead, it attaches a free-variable set to each binding,
         so that the type checker can do the dep anal.  Reason: the typechecker
         needs to do *two* analyses:
      	one to find the true mutually-recursive groups
      		(which we need so we can build the right CoreSyn)
      	one to find the groups in which to typecheck, taking
      		account of type signatures
      
      3. Implement non-ground SPECIALISE pragmas, as promised, and as
         requested by Remi and Ross.  Certainly, this should fix the 
         current problem with GHC, namely that if you have
      	g :: Eq a => a -> b -> b
         then you can now specialise thus
      	SPECIALISE g :: Int -> b -> b
          (This didn't use to work.)
      
         However, it goes further than that.  For example:
      	f :: (Eq a, Ix b) => a -> b -> b
         then you can make a partial specialisation
      	SPECIALISE f :: (Eq a) => a -> Int -> Int
      
          In principle, you can specialise f to *any* type that is
          "less polymorphic" (in the sense of subsumption) than f's 
          actual type.  Such as
      	SPECIALISE f :: Eq a => [a] -> Int -> Int
          But I haven't tested that.
      
          I implemented this by doing the specialisation in the typechecker
          and desugarer, rather than leaving around the strange SpecPragmaIds,
          for the specialiser to find.  Indeed, SpecPragmaIds have vanished 
          altogether (hooray).
      
          Pragmas in general are handled more tidily.  There's a new
          data type HsBinds.Prag, which lives in an AbsBinds, and carries
          pragma info from the typechecker to the desugarer.
      
      
      Smaller things
      
      - The loop in the renamer goes via RnExpr, instead of RnSource.
        (That makes it more like the type checker.)
      
      - I fixed the thing that was causing 'check_tc' warnings to be 
        emitted.
      a7ecdf96
  25. 19 May, 2005 1 commit
    • simonpj's avatar
      [project @ 2005-05-19 07:58:35 by simonpj] · f7ccc078
      simonpj authored
      Catch an exception in Template Haskell code
      
      		Merge to STABLE
      
      If the code run by a Template Haskell splice fails with, say,
      a pattern-match failure, we should not report it as a GHC panic.
      It's a bug in the user's program.
      
      This commit fixes up the exception handling to do the right thing.
      
      Fixes SourceForge item #1201666
      
      TH_fail tests it.
      f7ccc078
  26. 03 May, 2005 1 commit
    • simonpj's avatar
      [project @ 2005-05-03 11:10:08 by simonpj] · 56e6b584
      simonpj authored
      Improve generation of 'duplicate import' warnings.
      This involved changing (actually simplifying) the
      definition of RdrName.ImportSpec.
      
      I'm not sure whether this one merits merging or not.
      Perhaps worth a try.
      56e6b584
  27. 04 Apr, 2005 1 commit
    • simonpj's avatar
      [project @ 2005-04-04 11:55:11 by simonpj] · d551dbfe
      simonpj authored
      This commit combines three overlapping things:
      
      1.  Make rebindable syntax work for do-notation. The idea
          here is that, in particular, (>>=) can have a type that
          has class constraints on its argument types, e.g.
             (>>=) :: (Foo m, Baz a) => m a -> (a -> m b) -> m b
          The consequence is that a BindStmt and ExprStmt must have
          individual evidence attached -- previously it was one
          batch of evidence for the entire Do
          
          Sadly, we can't do this for MDo, because we use bind at
          a polymorphic type (to tie the knot), so we still use one
          blob of evidence (now in the HsStmtContext) for MDo.
          
          For arrow syntax, the evidence is in the HsCmd.
          
          For list comprehensions, it's all built-in anyway.
          
          So the evidence on a BindStmt is only used for ordinary
          do-notation.
      
      2.  Tidy up HsSyn.  In particular:
      
      	- Eliminate a few "Out" forms, which we can manage
      	without (e.g. 
      
      	- It ought to be the case that the type checker only
      	decorates the syntax tree, but doesn't change one
      	construct into another.  That wasn't true for NPat,
      	LitPat, NPlusKPat, so I've fixed that.
      
      	- Eliminate ResultStmts from Stmt.  They always had
      	to be the last Stmt, which led to awkward pattern
      	matching in some places; and the benefits didn't seem
      	to outweigh the costs.  Now each construct that uses
      	[Stmt] has a result expression too (e.g. GRHS).
      
      
      3.  Make 'deriving( Ix )' generate a binding for unsafeIndex,
          rather than for index.  This is loads more efficient.
      
          (This item only affects TcGenDeriv, but some of point (2)
          also affects TcGenDeriv, so it has to be in one commit.)
      d551dbfe
  28. 12 Jan, 2004 1 commit
  29. 09 Oct, 2003 1 commit