1. 01 Nov, 2010 1 commit
  2. 12 Nov, 2010 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      A (final) re-engineering of the new typechecker · c80364f8
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      Regression testing and user feedback for GHC 7.0 taught
      us a lot.  This patch fixes numerous small bugs, and some
      major ones (eg Trac #4484, #4492), and improves type
      error messages.
      
      The main changes are:
      
      * Entirely remove the "skolem equivalance class" stuff;
        a very useful simplification
      
      * Instead, when flattening "wanted" constraints we generate
        unification variables (not flatten-skolems) for the
        flattened type function application
      
      * We then need a fixup pass at the end, TcSimplify.solveCTyFunEqs,
        which resolves any residual equalities of form
            F xi ~ alpha
      
      * When we come across a definite failure (e.g. Int ~ [a]),
        we now defer reporting the error until the end, in case we
        learn more about 'a'.  That is particularly important for
        occurs-check errors.  These are called "frozen" type errors.
      
      * Other improvements in error message generation.
      
      * Better tracing messages
      c80364f8
  3. 21 Oct, 2010 1 commit
  4. 19 Oct, 2010 2 commits
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Fix debugger · 038a429f
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      A bit yukky; see Note [Runtime skolems] in TcErrors.
      But it works, and the debugger just is yukky in places.
      038a429f
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Clean up the debugger code · a40f2735
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      In particular there is much less fiddly skolemisation now
      Things are not *quite* right (break001 and 006 still fail), 
      but they are *much* better than before.
      a40f2735
  5. 15 Oct, 2010 1 commit
  6. 04 Oct, 2010 1 commit
  7. 18 Sep, 2010 1 commit
  8. 13 Sep, 2010 1 commit
  9. 22 Dec, 2009 1 commit
  10. 29 Oct, 2009 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      The Big INLINE Patch: totally reorganise way that INLINE pragmas work · 72462499
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      This patch has been a long time in gestation and has, as a
      result, accumulated some extra bits and bobs that are only
      loosely related.  I separated the bits that are easy to split
      off, but the rest comes as one big patch, I'm afraid.
      
      Note that:
       * It comes together with a patch to the 'base' library
       * Interface file formats change slightly, so you need to
         recompile all libraries
      
      The patch is mainly giant tidy-up, driven in part by the
      particular stresses of the Data Parallel Haskell project. I don't
      expect a big performance win for random programs.  Still, here are the
      nofib results, relative to the state of affairs without the patch
      
              Program           Size    Allocs   Runtime   Elapsed
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Min         -12.7%    -14.5%    -17.5%    -17.8%
                  Max          +4.7%    +10.9%     +9.1%     +8.4%
       Geometric Mean          +0.9%     -0.1%     -5.6%     -7.3%
      
      The +10.9% allocation outlier is rewrite, which happens to have a
      very delicate optimisation opportunity involving an interaction
      of CSE and inlining (see nofib/Simon-nofib-notes). The fact that
      the 'before' case found the optimisation is somewhat accidental.
      Runtimes seem to go down, but I never kno wwhether to really trust
      this number.  Binary sizes wobble a bit, but nothing drastic.
      
      
      The Main Ideas are as follows.
      
      InlineRules
      ~~~~~~~~~~~
      When you say 
            {-# INLINE f #-}
            f x = <rhs>
      you intend that calls (f e) are replaced by <rhs>[e/x] So we
      should capture (\x.<rhs>) in the Unfolding of 'f', and never meddle
      with it.  Meanwhile, we can optimise <rhs> to our heart's content,
      leaving the original unfolding intact in Unfolding of 'f'.
      
      So the representation of an Unfolding has changed quite a bit
      (see CoreSyn).  An INLINE pragma gives rise to an InlineRule 
      unfolding.  
      
      Moreover, it's only used when 'f' is applied to the
      specified number of arguments; that is, the number of argument on 
      the LHS of the '=' sign in the original source definition. 
      For example, (.) is now defined in the libraries like this
         {-# INLINE (.) #-}
         (.) f g = \x -> f (g x)
      so that it'll inline when applied to two arguments. If 'x' appeared
      on the left, thus
         (.) f g x = f (g x)
      it'd only inline when applied to three arguments.  This slightly-experimental
      change was requested by Roman, but it seems to make sense.
      
      Other associated changes
      
      * Moving the deck chairs in DsBinds, which processes the INLINE pragmas
      
      * In the old system an INLINE pragma made the RHS look like
         (Note InlineMe <rhs>)
        The Note switched off optimisation in <rhs>.  But it was quite
        fragile in corner cases. The new system is more robust, I believe.
        In any case, the InlineMe note has disappeared 
      
      * The workerInfo of an Id has also been combined into its Unfolding,
        so it's no longer a separate field of the IdInfo.
      
      * Many changes in CoreUnfold, esp in callSiteInline, which is the critical
        function that decides which function to inline.  Lots of comments added!
      
      * exprIsConApp_maybe has moved to CoreUnfold, since it's so strongly
        associated with "does this expression unfold to a constructor application".
        It can now do some limited beta reduction too, which Roman found 
        was an important.
      
      Instance declarations
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      It's always been tricky to get the dfuns generated from instance
      declarations to work out well.  This is particularly important in 
      the Data Parallel Haskell project, and I'm now on my fourth attempt,
      more or less.
      
      There is a detailed description in TcInstDcls, particularly in
      Note [How instance declarations are translated].   Roughly speaking
      we now generate a top-level helper function for every method definition
      in an instance declaration, so that the dfun takes a particularly
      stylised form:
        dfun a d1 d2 = MkD (op1 a d1 d2) (op2 a d1 d2) ...etc...
      
      In fact, it's *so* stylised that we never need to unfold a dfun.
      Instead ClassOps have a special rewrite rule that allows us to
      short-cut dictionary selection.  Suppose dfun :: Ord a -> Ord [a]
                                                  d :: Ord a
      Then   
          compare (dfun a d)  -->   compare_list a d 
      in one rewrite, without first inlining the 'compare' selector
      and the body of the dfun.
      
      To support this
      a) ClassOps have a BuiltInRule (see MkId.dictSelRule)
      b) DFuns have a special form of unfolding (CoreSyn.DFunUnfolding)
         which is exploited in CoreUnfold.exprIsConApp_maybe
      
      Implmenting all this required a root-and-branch rework of TcInstDcls
      and bits of TcClassDcl.
      
      
      Default methods
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      If you give an INLINE pragma to a default method, it should be just
      as if you'd written out that code in each instance declaration, including
      the INLINE pragma.  I think that it now *is* so.  As a result, library
      code can be simpler; less duplication.
      
      
      The CONLIKE pragma
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      In the DPH project, Roman found cases where he had
      
         p n k = let x = replicate n k
                 in ...(f x)...(g x)....
      
         {-# RULE f (replicate x) = f_rep x #-}
      
      Normally the RULE would not fire, because doing so involves 
      (in effect) duplicating the redex (replicate n k).  A new
      experimental modifier to the INLINE pragma, {-# INLINE CONLIKE
      replicate #-}, allows you to tell GHC to be prepared to duplicate
      a call of this function if it allows a RULE to fire.
      
      See Note [CONLIKE pragma] in BasicTypes
      
      
      Join points
      ~~~~~~~~~~~
      See Note [Case binders and join points] in Simplify
      
      
      Other refactoring
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      * I moved endPass from CoreLint to CoreMonad, with associated jigglings
      
      * Better pretty-printing of Core
      
      * The top-level RULES (ones that are not rules for locally-defined things)
        are now substituted on every simplifier iteration.  I'm not sure how
        we got away without doing this before.  This entails a bit more plumbing
        in SimplCore.
      
      * The necessary stuff to serialise and deserialise the new
        info across interface files.
      
      * Something about bottoming floats in SetLevels
            Note [Bottoming floats]
      
      * substUnfolding has moved from SimplEnv to CoreSubs, where it belongs
      
      
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Program           Size    Allocs   Runtime   Elapsed
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 anna          +2.4%     -0.5%      0.16      0.17
                 ansi          +2.6%     -0.1%      0.00      0.00
                 atom          -3.8%     -0.0%     -1.0%     -2.5%
               awards          +3.0%     +0.7%      0.00      0.00
               banner          +3.3%     -0.0%      0.00      0.00
           bernouilli          +2.7%     +0.0%     -4.6%     -6.9%
                boyer          +2.6%     +0.0%      0.06      0.07
               boyer2          +4.4%     +0.2%      0.01      0.01
                 bspt          +3.2%     +9.6%      0.02      0.02
            cacheprof          +1.4%     -1.0%    -12.2%    -13.6%
             calendar          +2.7%     -1.7%      0.00      0.00
             cichelli          +3.7%     -0.0%      0.13      0.14
              circsim          +3.3%     +0.0%     -2.3%     -9.9%
             clausify          +2.7%     +0.0%      0.05      0.06
        comp_lab_zift          +2.6%     -0.3%     -7.2%     -7.9%
             compress          +3.3%     +0.0%     -8.5%     -9.6%
            compress2          +3.6%     +0.0%    -15.1%    -17.8%
          constraints          +2.7%     -0.6%    -10.0%    -10.7%
         cryptarithm1          +4.5%     +0.0%     -4.7%     -5.7%
         cryptarithm2          +4.3%    -14.5%      0.02      0.02
                  cse          +4.4%     -0.0%      0.00      0.00
                eliza          +2.8%     -0.1%      0.00      0.00
                event          +2.6%     -0.0%     -4.9%     -4.4%
               exp3_8          +2.8%     +0.0%     -4.5%     -9.5%
               expert          +2.7%     +0.3%      0.00      0.00
                  fem          -2.0%     +0.6%      0.04      0.04
                  fft          -6.0%     +1.8%      0.05      0.06
                 fft2          -4.8%     +2.7%      0.13      0.14
             fibheaps          +2.6%     -0.6%      0.05      0.05
                 fish          +4.1%     +0.0%      0.03      0.04
                fluid          -2.1%     -0.2%      0.01      0.01
               fulsom          -4.8%     +9.2%     +9.1%     +8.4%
               gamteb          -7.1%     -1.3%      0.10      0.11
                  gcd          +2.7%     +0.0%      0.05      0.05
          gen_regexps          +3.9%     -0.0%      0.00      0.00
               genfft          +2.7%     -0.1%      0.05      0.06
                   gg          -2.7%     -0.1%      0.02      0.02
                 grep          +3.2%     -0.0%      0.00      0.00
               hidden          -0.5%     +0.0%    -11.9%    -13.3%
                  hpg          -3.0%     -1.8%     +0.0%     -2.4%
                  ida          +2.6%     -1.2%      0.17     -9.0%
                infer          +1.7%     -0.8%      0.08      0.09
              integer          +2.5%     -0.0%     -2.6%     -2.2%
            integrate          -5.0%     +0.0%     -1.3%     -2.9%
              knights          +4.3%     -1.5%      0.01      0.01
                 lcss          +2.5%     -0.1%     -7.5%     -9.4%
                 life          +4.2%     +0.0%     -3.1%     -3.3%
                 lift          +2.4%     -3.2%      0.00      0.00
            listcompr          +4.0%     -1.6%      0.16      0.17
             listcopy          +4.0%     -1.4%      0.17      0.18
             maillist          +4.1%     +0.1%      0.09      0.14
               mandel          +2.9%     +0.0%      0.11      0.12
              mandel2          +4.7%     +0.0%      0.01      0.01
              minimax          +3.8%     -0.0%      0.00      0.00
              mkhprog          +3.2%     -4.2%      0.00      0.00
           multiplier          +2.5%     -0.4%     +0.7%     -1.3%
             nucleic2          -9.3%     +0.0%      0.10      0.10
                 para          +2.9%     +0.1%     -0.7%     -1.2%
            paraffins         -10.4%     +0.0%      0.20     -1.9%
               parser          +3.1%     -0.0%      0.05      0.05
              parstof          +1.9%     -0.0%      0.00      0.01
                  pic          -2.8%     -0.8%      0.01      0.02
                power          +2.1%     +0.1%     -8.5%     -9.0%
               pretty         -12.7%     +0.1%      0.00      0.00
               primes          +2.8%     +0.0%      0.11      0.11
            primetest          +2.5%     -0.0%     -2.1%     -3.1%
               prolog          +3.2%     -7.2%      0.00      0.00
               puzzle          +4.1%     +0.0%     -3.5%     -8.0%
               queens          +2.8%     +0.0%      0.03      0.03
              reptile          +2.2%     -2.2%      0.02      0.02
              rewrite          +3.1%    +10.9%      0.03      0.03
                 rfib          -5.2%     +0.2%      0.03      0.03
                  rsa          +2.6%     +0.0%      0.05      0.06
                  scc          +4.6%     +0.4%      0.00      0.00
                sched          +2.7%     +0.1%      0.03      0.03
                  scs          -2.6%     -0.9%     -9.6%    -11.6%
               simple          -4.0%     +0.4%    -14.6%    -14.9%
                solid          -5.6%     -0.6%     -9.3%    -14.3%
              sorting          +3.8%     +0.0%      0.00      0.00
               sphere          -3.6%     +8.5%      0.15      0.16
               symalg          -1.3%     +0.2%      0.03      0.03
                  tak          +2.7%     +0.0%      0.02      0.02
            transform          +2.0%     -2.9%     -8.0%     -8.8%
             treejoin          +3.1%     +0.0%    -17.5%    -17.8%
            typecheck          +2.9%     -0.3%     -4.6%     -6.6%
              veritas          +3.9%     -0.3%      0.00      0.00
                 wang          -6.2%     +0.0%      0.18     -9.8%
            wave4main         -10.3%     +2.6%     -2.1%     -2.3%
         wheel-sieve1          +2.7%     -0.0%     +0.3%     -0.6%
         wheel-sieve2          +2.7%     +0.0%     -3.7%     -7.5%
                 x2n1          -4.1%     +0.1%      0.03      0.04
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Min         -12.7%    -14.5%    -17.5%    -17.8%
                  Max          +4.7%    +10.9%     +9.1%     +8.4%
       Geometric Mean          +0.9%     -0.1%     -5.6%     -7.3%
      72462499
  11. 27 Jul, 2009 1 commit
  12. 06 Jul, 2009 1 commit
  13. 09 Jun, 2009 1 commit
    • Duncan Coutts's avatar
      Typechecking for "foreign import prim" · 2da37f4f
      Duncan Coutts authored
      The main restriction is that all args and results must be unboxed types.
      In particular we allow unboxed tuple results (which is a primary
      motivation for the whole feature). The normal rules apply about
      "void rep" result types like State#. We only allow "prim" calling
      convention for import, not export. The other forms of import, "dynamic",
      "wrapper" and data label are banned as a conseqence of checking that the
      imported name is a valid C string. We currently require prim imports to
      be marked unsafe, though this is essentially arbitrary as the safety
      information is unused.
      2da37f4f
  14. 27 May, 2009 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Template Haskell: allow type splices · 389cca21
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      At last!  Trac #1476 and #3177
      
      This patch extends Template Haskell by allowing splices in
      types.  For example
      
        f :: Int -> $(burble 3)
      
      A type splice should work anywhere a type is expected.  This feature
      has been long requested, and quite a while ago I'd re-engineered the
      type checker to make it easier, but had never got around to finishing
      the job.  With luck, this does it.
      
      There's a ToDo in the HsSpliceTy case of RnTypes.rnHsType, where I
      am not dealing properly with the used variables; but that's awaiting
      the refactoring of the way we report unused names.
      
      
      389cca21
  15. 27 Apr, 2009 1 commit
    • chak@cse.unsw.edu.au.'s avatar
      Equality constraint solver is now externally pure · 296058a1
      chak@cse.unsw.edu.au. authored
      - This patch changes the equality constraint solver such that it does not
        instantiate any type variables that occur in the constraints that are to be
        solved (or in the environment).  Instead, it returns a bag of type bindings.
      - If these type bindings (together with the other results of the solver) are
        discarded, solver invocation has no effect (outside the solver) and can be
        repeated (that's imported for TcSimplifyRestricted).
      - For the type bindings to take effect, the caller of the solver needs to 
        execute them. 
      - The solver will still instantiate type variables thet were created during 
        solving (e.g., skolem flexibles used during type flattening).
      
        See also http://hackage.haskell.org/trac/ghc/wiki/TypeFunctionsSolving
      296058a1
  16. 30 Mar, 2009 1 commit
  17. 26 Mar, 2009 1 commit
  18. 05 Mar, 2009 2 commits
  19. 03 Mar, 2009 1 commit
  20. 25 Nov, 2008 1 commit
  21. 25 Sep, 2008 1 commit
  22. 10 Sep, 2008 1 commit
  23. 03 Sep, 2008 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Major change in compilation of instance declarations (fix Trac #955, #2328) · f16dbbbe
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      This patch makes an important change to the way that dictionary
      functions are handled.  Before, they were unconditionally marked
      INLIINE, but all the code written by the user in the instance
      was inside that unconditionally-inlined function.  Result: massive
      code bloat in programs that use complicated instances.
      
      This patch make instances behave rather as if all the methods
      were written in separate definitions.  That dramatically reduces
      bloat.  The new plan is described in TcInstDcls
      	Note [How instance declarations are translated]
      
      Everything validates.  The major code-bloat bug is squashed: in particular
      DoCon is fine now (Trac #2328) and I believe that #955 is also better.
      
      Nofib results:
      
      Binary sizes
              -1 s.d.      +2.5%
              +1 s.d.      +3.1%
              Average      +2.8%
      
      Allocations
              -1 s.d.      -6.4%
              +1 s.d.      +2.5%
              Average      -2.0%
      
      Note that 2% improvement.  Some programs improve by 20% (rewrite)!
      Two get slightly worse: pic (2.1%), and gameteb (3.2%), but all others
      improve or stay the same.
      
      I am not absolutely 100% certain that all the corners are correct; for
      example, when default methods are marked INLINE, are they inlined?  But
      overall it's better.
      
      It's nice that the patch also removes a lot of code.  I deleted some
      out of date comments, but there's something like 100 fewer lines of
      code in the new version!  (In the line counts below, there are a lot
      of new comments.)
      f16dbbbe
  24. 31 Jul, 2008 1 commit
  25. 09 Jul, 2008 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      add -fwarn-dodgy-foreign-imports (see #1357) · 3b6382e4
      Simon Marlow authored
      From the entry in the User's guide:
      
      -fwarn-dodgy-foreign-imports causes a warning to be emitted for
      foreign imports of the following form:
      
      foreign import "f" f :: FunPtr t
      
      on the grounds that it probably should be
      
      foreign import "&f" f :: FunPtr t
      
      The first form declares that `f` is a (pure) C function that takes no
      arguments and returns a pointer to a C function with type `t`, whereas
      the second form declares that `f` itself is a C function with type
      `t`.  The first declaration is usually a mistake, and one that is hard
      to debug because it results in a crash, hence this warning.
      3b6382e4
  26. 20 May, 2008 1 commit
  27. 23 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  28. 12 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  29. 29 Mar, 2008 1 commit
  30. 15 Mar, 2008 1 commit
  31. 07 Jan, 2008 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Make the treatment of equalities more uniform · 3787d987
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      This patch (which is part of the fix for Trac #2018) makes coercion variables
      be handled more uniformly.  Generally, they are treated like dictionaries
      in the type checker, not like type variables, but in a couple of places we
      were treating them like type variables.  Also when zonking we should use
      zonkDictBndr not zonkIdBndr.
      3787d987
  32. 06 Nov, 2007 1 commit
  33. 29 Oct, 2007 1 commit
  34. 19 Oct, 2007 1 commit
    • chak@cse.unsw.edu.au.'s avatar
      Zonk quantified tyvars with skolems · cad764aa
      chak@cse.unsw.edu.au. authored
      We used to zonk quantified type variables to regular TyVars.  However, this
      leads to problems.  Consider this program from the regression test suite:
      
        eval :: Int -> String -> String -> String
        eval 0 root actual = evalRHS 0 root actual
      
        evalRHS :: Int -> a
        evalRHS 0 root actual = eval 0 root actual
      
      It leads to the deferral of an equality
      
        (String -> String -> String) ~ a
      
      which is propagated up to the toplevel (see TcSimplify.tcSimplifyInferCheck).
      In the meantime `a' is zonked and quantified to form `evalRHS's signature.
      This has the *side effect* of also zonking the `a' in the deferred equality
      (which at this point is being handed around wrapped in an implication
      constraint).
      
      Finally, the equality (with the zonked `a') will be handed back to the
      simplifier by TcRnDriver.tcRnSrcDecls calling TcSimplify.tcSimplifyTop.
      If we zonk `a' with a regular type variable, we will have this regular type
      variable now floating around in the simplifier, which in many places assumes to
      only see proper TcTyVars.
      
      We can avoid this problem by zonking with a skolem.  The skolem is rigid
      (which we requirefor a quantified variable), but is still a TcTyVar that the
      simplifier knows how to deal with.
      cad764aa
  35. 11 Oct, 2007 1 commit
  36. 04 Sep, 2007 1 commit
  37. 03 Sep, 2007 1 commit
  38. 01 Sep, 2007 1 commit