Commit 025b7978 authored by Ross Paterson's avatar Ross Paterson
Browse files

Fix indexing of a few operators, particularly (\\), which was making a

a small mess.
parent a0d58cd3
......@@ -77,7 +77,7 @@ inner v w = if b == bounds w
\label{array-examples}
\end{figure}
The @(!)@\index{!@@{\tt {\char'041}}} operator denotes array subscripting.
The @(!)@\index{""!@@{\tt {\char'041}}} operator denotes array subscripting.
% array subscripting -- if the index lies outside the bounds of the
% array, the result is undefined.
The @bounds@\indextt{bounds} function
......
%
% $Header: /home/cvs/root/haskell-report/report/basic.verb,v 1.14 2002/12/03 01:17:13 ross Exp $
% $Header: /home/cvs/root/haskell-report/report/basic.verb,v 1.15 2002/12/03 10:27:21 ross Exp $
%
%**<title>The Haskell 98 Report: Predefined Types and Classes</title>
%*section 6
......@@ -211,7 +211,7 @@ the Prelude.
\subsection{Strict Evaluation}
\label{strict-eval}
\indextt{$!}
\index{$""!@@{\tt {\char'044}{\char'041}}}
\indextt{seq}
Function application in Haskell is non-strict; that is, a function
argument is evaluated only when required. Sometimes it is desirable to
......
%
% $Header: /home/cvs/root/haskell-report/report/decls.verb,v 1.16 2002/12/02 14:53:27 simonpj Exp $
% $Header: /home/cvs/root/haskell-report/report/decls.verb,v 1.17 2002/12/03 10:27:21 ross Exp $
%
%**<title>The Haskell 98 Report: Declarations</title>
%*section 4
......@@ -617,7 +617,7 @@ Whenever a data constructor is applied, each argument to the
constructor is evaluated if and only if the corresponding type in the
algebraic datatype declaration has a strictness flag, denoted by
an exclamation point, ``@!@''.
\indextt{!}
\index{""!@@{\tt {\char'041}}}
Lexically, ``@!@'' is an ordinary varsym not a "reservedop";
it has special significance only in the context of the argument types of
a data declaration.
......@@ -1462,7 +1462,7 @@ edence & operators & operators & operators \\ \hline\hline
\indextt{>=}
\indextt{elem}
\indextt{notElem}
\indextt{&&@@{\tt \&\&}}
\index{&&@@{\tt \&\&}}
\index{""|""|@@{\tt {\char'174}{\char'174}}}
\indextt{>>}
\indextt{>>=}
......
%
% $Header: /home/cvs/root/haskell-report/report/derived.verb,v 1.10 2002/12/02 14:53:27 simonpj Exp $
% $Header: /home/cvs/root/haskell-report/report/derived.verb,v 1.11 2002/12/03 10:27:22 ross Exp $
%
% The paragraph describing the formats of standard representations might
% be deleted, since the info is already in the Prelude.
......@@ -131,18 +131,18 @@ always refer to entities defined by the @Prelude@.
\indexdi{Ord}
The class methods automatically introduced by derived instances
of @Eq@ and @Ord@ are @(==)@,
\index{==@@{\tt ==}}
\indextt{==}
@(/=)@,
\index{/=@@{\tt /=}}
\indextt{/=}
@compare@\indextt{compare},
@(<)@,
\index{<@@{\tt <}}
\indextt{<}
@(<=)@,
\index{<=@@{\tt <=}}
\indextt{<=}
@(>)@,
\index{>@@{\tt >}}
\indextt{>}
@(>=)@,
\index{>=@@{\tt >=}}
\indextt{>=}
@max@\indextt{max}, and
@min@\indextt{min}. The latter seven operators are defined so
as to compare their arguments lexicographically with respect to
......
......@@ -94,8 +94,8 @@
\index{type signature!for an expression|see{expression type-signature}}
%
\index{(aaa)@@{\tt ()}|see{trivial type and unit expression}}%
\index{-@@{\tt -}|hseealso{negation}}
\index{+@@{\tt +}|hseealso{"n@+@k" pattern}}
\index{-@@{\tt -}|hseealso{negation}}
\index{+@@{\tt +}|hseealso{"n@+@k" pattern}}
\index{\\@@{\tt {\char'134}}|see{lambda abstraction}}
\index{~@@{\tt {\char'176}}|see{irrefutable pattern}}
\index{derived instance|hseealso{instance declaration}}
......
......@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ e.g.,
\eprog
\item
@(\\)@\indextt{(\\)} is list
@(\\)@\index{\\\\@@{\tt {\char'134}{\char'134}}} is list
difference (non-associative). In the result of @xs \\ ys@,
the first occurrence of each element of @ys@ in turn (if any)
has been removed from @xs@. Thus, @(xs ++ ys) \\ xs == ys@.
......
......@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ over $t$. If $t$ is a bounded type, the results may be unpredictable;
for example @Ratio Int@ may give rise to integer overflow even for
rational numbers of small absolute size.
The operator @(%)@\index{%@@{\tt {\char'045}}} forms the ratio of two
The operator @(%)@\index{%@@{\tt {\char'045}}} forms the ratio of two
integral numbers, reducing the fraction to terms with no common factor
and such that the denominator is positive. The functions
@numerator@\indextt{numerator}
......
eval "exec perl -S $0 $*"
if $running_under_some_random_shell;
#
# $Header: /home/cvs/root/haskell-report/tools/splitAndIndexPgm,v 1.2 2001/09/11 13:04:28 simonpj Exp $
# $Header: /home/cvs/root/haskell-report/tools/splitAndIndexPgm,v 1.3 2002/12/03 10:27:22 ross Exp $
#
# This script reads a Haskell program and inserts LaTeX/verbatim
# magic to indicate where a page break may occur.
......@@ -118,6 +118,7 @@ sub printIndexEntries { # also re-sets $indexentries, specialentries
$raw =~ s/\|/""\|/g;
$raw =~ s/!/""!/g;
$raw =~ s/\@/""\@\@/g;
$raw =~ s/\\/\\\\/g;
print "\\index\{$raw\@\@$processed\}%\n";
} else {
......
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