1. 08 Jul, 2008 1 commit
  2. 16 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  3. 04 Jul, 2007 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      We don't need a SIGCONT handler any more · 10ba2ab9
      Simon Marlow authored
      The SIGCONT handler was used to put stdin back in O_NONBLOCK mode,
      after the process is resumed, but we don't want to do that now: the
      standard handles are kept in blocking mode.
      10ba2ab9
  4. 03 Apr, 2007 1 commit
  5. 30 Dec, 2006 1 commit
  6. 15 Dec, 2006 1 commit
  7. 15 Nov, 2006 1 commit
  8. 24 Oct, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Split GC.c, and move storage manager into sm/ directory · ab0e778c
      Simon Marlow authored
      In preparation for parallel GC, split up the monolithic GC.c file into
      smaller parts.  Also in this patch (and difficult to separate,
      unfortunatley):
        
        - Don't include Stable.h in Rts.h, instead just include it where
          necessary.
        
        - consistently use STATIC_INLINE in source files, and INLINE_HEADER
          in header files.  STATIC_INLINE is now turned off when DEBUG is on,
          to make debugging easier.
        
        - The GC no longer takes the get_roots function as an argument.
          We weren't making use of this generalisation.
      ab0e778c
  9. 30 Aug, 2006 1 commit
  10. 26 Jul, 2006 1 commit
  11. 24 May, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Better control of the IO manager thread; improvements to deadlock checking · 7a1f8fbd
      Simon Marlow authored
          
      In the threaded RTS on *nix platforms:
          
       - we now start the IO manager thread eagerly at startup time
         (previously was started on demand).
      
       - we now ask the IO manager thread to stop at shutdown
          
       - In Timer.c:handle_tick, if it looks like we might be in a
         deadlock, instead of calling prodOneCapability() which was known to be
         wrong, we now send a byte down the IO manager's pipe to wake it up.
        
      This also avoids a case of double-acquisition of a mutex, which
      happened if prodOneCapability() was called while the current thread
      was holding a mutex.
      7a1f8fbd
  12. 07 Apr, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Reorganisation of the source tree · 0065d5ab
      Simon Marlow authored
      Most of the other users of the fptools build system have migrated to
      Cabal, and with the move to darcs we can now flatten the source tree
      without losing history, so here goes.
      
      The main change is that the ghc/ subdir is gone, and most of what it
      contained is now at the top level.  The build system now makes no
      pretense at being multi-project, it is just the GHC build system.
      
      No doubt this will break many things, and there will be a period of
      instability while we fix the dependencies.  A straightforward build
      should work, but I haven't yet fixed binary/source distributions.
      Changes to the Building Guide will follow, too.
      0065d5ab
  13. 15 Mar, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Improvements to shutting down of the runtime · 5638488b
      Simon Marlow authored
      Yet another attempt at shutdown & interruption.  This one appears to
      work better; ^C is more responsive in multi threaded / SMP, and I
      fixed one case where the runtime wasn't responding to ^C at all.
      5638488b
  14. 03 Nov, 2005 2 commits
  15. 21 Oct, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-10-21 14:02:17 by simonmar] · 03a9ff01
      simonmar authored
      Big re-hash of the threaded/SMP runtime
      
      This is a significant reworking of the threaded and SMP parts of
      the runtime.  There are two overall goals here:
      
        - To push down the scheduler lock, reducing contention and allowing
          more parts of the system to run without locks.  In particular,
          the scheduler does not require a lock any more in the common case.
      
        - To improve affinity, so that running Haskell threads stick to the
          same OS threads as much as possible.
      
      At this point we have the basic structure working, but there are some
      pieces missing.  I believe it's reasonably stable - the important
      parts of the testsuite pass in all the (normal,threaded,SMP) ways.
      
      In more detail:
      
        - Each capability now has a run queue, instead of one global run
          queue.  The Capability and Task APIs have been completely
          rewritten; see Capability.h and Task.h for the details.
      
        - Each capability has its own pool of worker Tasks.  Hence, Haskell
          threads on a Capability's run queue will run on the same worker
          Task(s).  As long as the OS is doing something reasonable, this
          should mean they usually stick to the same CPU.  Another way to
          look at this is that we're assuming each Capability is associated
          with a fixed CPU.
      
        - What used to be StgMainThread is now part of the Task structure.
          Every OS thread in the runtime has an associated Task, and it
          can ask for its current Task at any time with myTask().
      
        - removed RTS_SUPPORTS_THREADS symbol, use THREADED_RTS instead
          (it is now defined for SMP too).
      
        - The RtsAPI has had to change; we must explicitly pass a Capability
          around now.  The previous interface assumed some global state.
          SchedAPI has also changed a lot.
      
        - The OSThreads API now supports thread-local storage, used to
          implement myTask(), although it could be done more efficiently
          using gcc's __thread extension when available.
      
        - I've moved some POSIX-specific stuff into the posix subdirectory,
          moving in the direction of separating out platform-specific
          implementations.
      
        - lots of lock-debugging and assertions in the runtime.  In particular,
          when DEBUG is on, we catch multiple ACQUIRE_LOCK()s, and there is
          also an ASSERT_LOCK_HELD() call.
      
      What's missing so far:
      
        - I have almost certainly broken the Win32 build, will fix soon.
      
        - any kind of thread migration or load balancing.  This is high up
          the agenda, though.
      
        - various performance tweaks to do
      
        - throwTo and forkProcess still do not work in SMP mode
      03a9ff01
  16. 24 Apr, 2005 1 commit
  17. 07 Apr, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-04-07 14:33:30 by simonmar] · 5a148f04
      simonmar authored
      Support handling signals in the threaded RTS by passing the signal
      number down the pipe to the IO manager.  This avoids needing
      synchronisation in the signal handler.
      
      Signals should now work with -threaded.  Since this is a bugfix, I'll
      merge the changes into the 6.4 branch.
      5a148f04
  18. 28 Jan, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-01-28 12:55:17 by simonmar] · 153b9cb9
      simonmar authored
      Rationalise the BUILD,HOST,TARGET defines.
      
      Recall that:
      
        - build is the platform we're building on
        - host is the platform we're running on
        - target is the platform we're generating code for
      
      The change is that now we take these definitions as applying from the
      point of view of the particular source code being built, rather than
      the point of view of the whole build tree.
      
      For example, in RTS and library code, we were previously testing the
      TARGET platform.  But under the new rule, the platform on which this
      code is going to run is the HOST platform.  TARGET only makes sense in
      the compiler sources.
      
      In practical terms, this means that the values of BUILD, HOST & TARGET
      may vary depending on which part of the build tree we are in.
      
      Actual changes:
      
       - new file: includes/ghcplatform.h contains platform defines for
         the RTS and library code.
      
       - new file: includes/ghcautoconf.h contains the autoconf settings
         only (HAVE_BLAH).  This is so that we can get hold of these
         settings independently of the platform defines when necessary
         (eg. in GHC).
      
       - ghcconfig.h now #includes both ghcplatform.h and ghcautoconf.h.
      
       - MachRegs.h, which is included into both the compiler and the RTS,
         now has to cope with the fact that it might need to test either
         _TARGET_ or _HOST_ depending on the context.
      
       - the compiler's Makefile now generates
           stage{1,2,3}/ghc_boot_platform.h
         which contains platform defines for the compiler.  These differ
         depending on the stage, of course: in stage2, the HOST is the
         TARGET of stage1.  This was wrong before.
      
       - The compiler doesn't get platform info from Config.hs any more.
         Previously it did (sometimes), but unless we want to generate
         a new Config.hs for each stage we can't do this.
      
       - GHC now helpfully defines *_{BUILD,HOST}_{OS,ARCH} automatically
         in CPP'd Haskell source.
      
       - ghcplatform.h defines *_TARGET_* for backwards compatibility
         (ghcplatform.h is included by ghcconfig.h, which is included by
         config.h, so code which still #includes config.h will get the TARGET
         settings as before).
      
       - The Users's Guide is updated to mention *_HOST_* rather than
         *_TARGET_*.
      
       - coding-style.html in the commentary now contains a section on
         platform defines.  There are further doc updates to come.
      
      Thanks to Wolfgang Thaller for pointing me in the right direction.
      153b9cb9
  19. 14 Oct, 2004 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2004-10-14 14:58:37 by simonmar] · bb01a96b
      simonmar authored
      Threaded RTS improvements:
      
       - Unix only: implement waitRead#, waitWrite# and delay# in Haskell,
         by having a single Haskell thread (the IO manager) performing a blocking
         select() operation.  Threads communicate with the IO manager
         via channels.  This is faster than doing the select() in the RTS,
         because we only restart the select() when a new request arrives,
         rather than each time around the scheduler.
      
         On Windows we just make blocking IO calls, we don't have a fancy IO
         manager (yet).
      
       - Simplify the scheduler for the threaded RTS, now that we don't have
         to wait for IO in the scheduler loop.
      
       - Remove detectBlackHoles(), which isn't used now (not sure how long
         this has been unused for... perhaps it was needed back when main threads
         used to be GC roots, so we had to check for blackholes manually rather
         than relying on the GC.)
      
      Signals aren't quite right in the threaded RTS.  In fact, they're
      slightly worse than before, because the thread receiving signals might
      be blocked in a C call - previously there always be another thread
      stuck in awaitEvent() that would notice the signal, but that's not
      true now.  I can't see an easy fix yet.
      bb01a96b
  20. 12 Sep, 2004 1 commit
  21. 03 Sep, 2004 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2004-09-03 15:28:18 by simonmar] · 95ca6bff
      simonmar authored
      Cleanup: all (well, most) messages from the RTS now go through the
      functions in RtsUtils: barf(), debugBelch() and errorBelch().  The
      latter two were previously called belch() and prog_belch()
      respectively.  See the comments for the right usage of these message
      functions.
      
      One reason for doing this is so that we can avoid spurious uses of
      stdout/stderr by Haskell apps on platforms where we shouldn't be using
      them (eg. non-console apps on Windows).
      95ca6bff
  22. 13 Aug, 2004 1 commit
  23. 31 Oct, 2003 1 commit
  24. 20 Oct, 2003 1 commit
    • sof's avatar
      [project @ 2003-10-20 17:15:27 by sof] · d0c6e4ec
      sof authored
      Console event handling support (i.e., Haskell-side support for SIGINT under win32).
      
      win32/ConsoleHandler.h implements the Signals.h API. No library support
      for installing user event handlers included in this commit.
      d0c6e4ec
  25. 21 Sep, 2003 1 commit
  26. 01 Apr, 2003 1 commit
    • sof's avatar
      [project @ 2003-04-01 15:05:13 by sof] · c49a6ca9
      sof authored
      Tidy up code that supports user/Haskell signal handlers.
      
      Signals.h now defines RTS_USER_SIGNALS when this is supported,
      which is then used elsewhere.
      c49a6ca9
  27. 29 Mar, 2003 1 commit
  28. 25 Mar, 2003 1 commit
  29. 01 Feb, 2003 1 commit
  30. 25 Jan, 2003 1 commit
    • wolfgang's avatar
      [project @ 2003-01-25 15:54:48 by wolfgang] · af136096
      wolfgang authored
      This commit fixes many bugs and limitations in the threaded RTS.
      There are still some issues remaining, though.
      
      The following bugs should have been fixed:
      
      - [+] "safe" calls could cause crashes
      - [+] yieldToReturningWorker/grabReturnCapability
          -     It used to deadlock.
      - [+] couldn't wake blocked workers
          -     Calls into the RTS could go unanswered for a long time, and
                that includes ordinary callbacks in some circumstances.
      - [+] couldn't block on an MVar and expect to be woken up by a signal
            handler
          -     Depending on the exact situation, the RTS shut down or
                blocked forever and ignored the signal.
      - [+] The locking scheme in RtsAPI.c didn't work
      - [+] run_thread label in wrong place (schedule())
      - [+] Deadlock in GHC.Handle
          -     if a signal arrived at the wrong time, an mvar was never
                filled again
      - [+] Signals delivered to the "wrong" thread were ignored or handled
            too late.
      
      Issues:
      *) If GC can move TSO objects (I don't know - can it?), then ghci
      will occasionally crash when calling foreign functions, because the
      parameters are stored on the TSO stack.
      
      *) There is still a race condition lurking in the code
      (both threaded and non-threaded RTS are affected):
      If a signal arrives after the check for pending signals in
      schedule(), but before the call to select() in awaitEvent(),
      select() will be called anyway. The signal handler will be
      executed much later than expected.
      
      *) For Win32, GHC doesn't yet support non-blocking IO, so while a
      thread is waiting for IO, no call-ins can happen. If the RTS is
      blocked in awaitEvent, it uses a polling loop on Win32, so call-ins
      should work (although the polling loop looks ugly).
      
      *) Deadlock detection is disabled for the threaded rts, because I
      don't know how to do it properly in the presence of foreign call-ins
      from foreign threads.
      This causes the tests conc031, conc033 and conc034 to fail.
      
      *) "safe" is currently treated as "threadsafe". Implementing "safe" in
      a way that blocks other Haskell threads is more difficult than was
      thought at first. I think it could be done with a few additional lines
      of code, but personally, I'm strongly in favour of abolishing the
      distinction.
      
      *) Running finalizers at program termination is inefficient - there
      are two OS threads passing messages back and forth for every finalizer
      that is run. Also (just as in the non-threaded case) the finalizers
      are run in parallel to any remaining haskell threads and to any
      foreign call-ins that might still happen.
      af136096
  31. 10 Jan, 2003 1 commit
  32. 11 Dec, 2002 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2002-12-11 15:36:20 by simonmar] · 0bffc410
      simonmar authored
      Merge the eval-apply-branch on to the HEAD
      ------------------------------------------
      
      This is a change to GHC's evaluation model in order to ultimately make
      GHC more portable and to reduce complexity in some areas.
      
      At some point we'll update the commentary to describe the new state of
      the RTS.  Pending that, the highlights of this change are:
      
        - No more Su.  The Su register is gone, update frames are one
          word smaller.
      
        - Slow-entry points and arg checks are gone.  Unknown function calls
          are handled by automatically-generated RTS entry points (AutoApply.hc,
          generated by the program in utils/genapply).
      
        - The stack layout is stricter: there are no "pending arguments" on
          the stack any more, the stack is always strictly a sequence of
          stack frames.
      
          This means that there's no need for LOOKS_LIKE_GHC_INFO() or
          LOOKS_LIKE_STATIC_CLOSURE() any more, and GHC doesn't need to know
          how to find the boundary between the text and data segments (BIG WIN!).
      
        - A couple of nasty hacks in the mangler caused by the neet to
          identify closure ptrs vs. info tables have gone away.
      
        - Info tables are a bit more complicated.  See InfoTables.h for the
          details.
      
        - As a side effect, GHCi can now deal with polymorphic seq.  Some bugs
          in GHCi which affected primitives and unboxed tuples are now
          fixed.
      
        - Binary sizes are reduced by about 7% on x86.  Performance is roughly
          similar, some programs get faster while some get slower.  I've seen
          GHCi perform worse on some examples, but haven't investigated
          further yet (GHCi performance *should* be about the same or better
          in theory).
      
        - Internally the code generator is rather better organised.  I've moved
          info-table generation from the NCG into the main codeGen where it is
          shared with the C back-end; info tables are now emitted as arrays
          of words in both back-ends.  The NCG is one step closer to being able
          to support profiling.
      
      This has all been fairly thoroughly tested, but no doubt I've messed
      up the commit in some way.
      0bffc410
  33. 05 Dec, 2002 1 commit
    • stolz's avatar
      [project @ 2002-12-05 14:20:55 by stolz] · 6ff1e84b
      stolz authored
      Add SA_RESETHAND (aka SA_ONESHOT) support.
      Requested by: John Meacham
      
      > module Main where
      
      > import System.Posix.Signals
      
      > main = do
      >   installHandler sigUSR1 (Catch (print "usr1")) Nothing
      >   installHandler sigUSR2 (CatchOnce (print "usr2")) Nothing
      >   _ <- getLine
      >   return ()
      6ff1e84b
  34. 17 Sep, 2002 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2002-09-17 12:11:44 by simonmar] · 48c557b5
      simonmar authored
      The GC wasn't properly marking pending signal handlers, which could
      lead to "EVACUATED object entered!" errors.  Also, a race occurs if a
      signal arrives during GC.  Two fixes:
      
        (a) mark all pending signal handlers during GC, and
        (b) block signals during GC
      
      MERGE TO STABLE
      48c557b5
  35. 06 Sep, 2002 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2002-09-06 14:34:13 by simonmar] · 77186ef4
      simonmar authored
      Partial rewrite of the POSIX library.
      
      The main purpose of this sweep is to remove the last dependencies of
      the compiler on hslibs.  When I've committed the associated compiler
      changes, only the 'base' package will be required to bootstrap the
      compiler.  Additionally to build GHCi, the 'readline' and 'unix'
      packages will be required.
      
      The new POSIX library lives mostly in libraries/unix, with a few bits
      required for compiler bootstrapping in libraries/base.  The 'base'
      package is mostly free of hsc2hs code to make bootstrapping from HC
      files easier, but the 'unix' package will use hsc2hs liberally.
      
      The old POSIX library continues to provide more-or-less the same
      interface as before, although some of the types are more correct now
      (previously lots of POSIX types were just mapped to Int).  The new
      interface is largely the same as the old, except that some new
      functionality from the latest POSIX spec has been added (eg. symbolic
      links).
      
      So far, the new POSIX library has signal support, directory/file
      operations and lots of stuff from unistd.h.  The module names are:
      
        System.Posix
      	The main dude, exports everything
      
        System.Posix.Types
      	All the POSIX types, using the same naming scheme as
              Foreign.C.Types, Eg. CUid, COff, etc.  Many of these types
              were previously exported by GHC.Posix.
      
              Additionally exports the "nicer" names used by the old POSIX
      	library for compatibility (eg. ProcessID == CPid, FileMode ==
      	CMode, etc.)
      
      	All reasonable instances are derived for these types.
      
        System.Posix.Signals
      	Signal support, contains most of which was in PosixProcPrim before.
      	The RTS interface to the signal handling support has been
      	rationalised slightly.
      
        System.Posix.Directory
       	Directory support, most were in PosixFiles before.
      
        System.Posix.Files
      	File operations, most were in PosixFiles before.
      
        System.Posix.Unistd
      	(for want of a better name) Miscellaneous bits that mostly come
      	from the unistd.h header file.  PosixProcEnv before.
      
      The rest of the library should pan out like so:
      
        System.Posix.IO
        System.Posix.Error   (maybe)
        System.Posix.Process
        System.Posix.Terminal
      
      (I've no doubt broken Win32 support, but I'm checking the build at the moment).
      77186ef4
  36. 03 Sep, 2002 1 commit
  37. 17 Jul, 2002 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2002-07-17 09:21:48 by simonmar] · 7457757f
      simonmar authored
      Remove most #includes of system headers from Stg.h, and instead
      #include any required headers directly in each RTS source file.
      
      The idea is to (a) reduce namespace pollution from system headers that
      we don't need, (c) be clearer about dependencies on system things in
      the RTS, and (c) improve via-C compilation times (maybe).
      
      In practice though, HsBase.h #includes everything anyway, so the
      difference from the point of view of .hc source is minimal.  However,
      this makes it easier to move to zero-includes if we wanted to (see
      discussion on the FFI list; I'm still not sure that's possible but
      at least this is a step in the right direction).
      7457757f
  38. 02 Jul, 2002 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2002-07-02 12:24:48 by simonmar] · cd147bc3
      simonmar authored
      Don't install a SIGFPE handler: this causes us to go into an infinite
      loop on a divide by zero on some systems (BSD, but not Linux it
      seems).  I don't think we really ought to be ignoring SIGFPE: for
      floating point exceptions, the system usually has a way to request
      that operations generate exceptional values rather than signals (this
      is the required IEEE behaviour), and for integral division we should
      really check beforehand for division by zero (we don't yet).
      cd147bc3
  39. 26 Mar, 2002 1 commit