1. 30 May, 2014 1 commit
  2. 15 May, 2014 1 commit
    • Herbert Valerio Riedel's avatar
      Add LANGUAGE pragmas to compiler/ source files · 23892440
      Herbert Valerio Riedel authored
      In some cases, the layout of the LANGUAGE/OPTIONS_GHC lines has been
      reorganized, while following the convention, to
      
      - place `{-# LANGUAGE #-}` pragmas at the top of the source file, before
        any `{-# OPTIONS_GHC #-}`-lines.
      
      - Moreover, if the list of language extensions fit into a single
        `{-# LANGUAGE ... -#}`-line (shorter than 80 characters), keep it on one
        line. Otherwise split into `{-# LANGUAGE ... -#}`-lines for each
        individual language extension. In both cases, try to keep the
        enumeration alphabetically ordered.
        (The latter layout is preferable as it's more diff-friendly)
      
      While at it, this also replaces obsolete `{-# OPTIONS ... #-}` pragma
      occurences by `{-# OPTIONS_GHC ... #-}` pragmas.
      23892440
  3. 03 May, 2014 1 commit
  4. 23 Mar, 2014 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Simplify handling of the interactive package; fixes Trac #8831 · 28e8d878
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      This patch is really a fix to the big commint
         73c08ab1
         Re-work the naming story for the GHCi prompt (Trac #8649)
      which introduced the 'interactive' package
      See Note [The interactive package] in HscTypes
      
      The original commit set both
        (a) The tcg_mod field of TcGblEnv to 'interactive:Ghci4' (say)
        (b) The thisPackage field of DynFlags to 'interactive'
      
      But the second step interacts badly with linking.  :loaded modules are
      in the package set by 'thisPackage' (usually 'main'); if you change
      that, then we try to link package 'main', but can't find it, and
      that is what happened in #8831.
      
      The fix was simple: do (a) but not (b).
      
      I changed Note [The interactive package] in HscTypes to describe this.
      28e8d878
  5. 20 Jan, 2014 1 commit
    • cactus's avatar
      Implement pattern synonyms · 4f8369bf
      cactus authored
      This patch implements Pattern Synonyms (enabled by -XPatternSynonyms),
      allowing y ou to assign names to a pattern and abstract over it.
      
      The rundown is this:
      
        * Named patterns are introduced by the new 'pattern' keyword, and can
          be either *unidirectional* or *bidirectional*. A unidirectional
          pattern is, in the simplest sense, simply an 'alias' for a pattern,
          where the LHS may mention variables to occur in the RHS. A
          bidirectional pattern synonym occurs when a pattern may also be used
          in expression context.
      
        * Unidirectional patterns are declared like thus:
      
              pattern P x <- x:_
      
          The synonym 'P' may only occur in a pattern context:
      
              foo :: [Int] -> Maybe Int
              foo (P x) = Just x
              foo _     = Nothing
      
        * Bidirectional patterns are declared like thus:
      
              pattern P x y = [x, y]
      
          Here, P may not only occur as a pattern, but also as an expression
          when given values for 'x' and 'y', i.e.
      
              bar :: Int -> [Int]
              bar x = P x 10
      
        * Patterns can't yet have their own type signatures; signatures are inferred.
      
        * Pattern synonyms may not be recursive, c.f. type synonyms.
      
        * Pattern synonyms are also exported/imported using the 'pattern'
          keyword in an import/export decl, i.e.
      
              module Foo (pattern Bar) where ...
      
          Note that pattern synonyms share the namespace of constructors, so
          this disambiguation is required as a there may also be a 'Bar'
          type in scope as well as the 'Bar' pattern.
      
        * The semantics of a pattern synonym differ slightly from a typical
          pattern: when using a synonym, the pattern itself is matched,
          followed by all the arguments. This means that the strictness
          differs slightly:
      
              pattern P x y <- [x, y]
      
              f (P True True) = True
              f _             = False
      
              g [True, True] = True
              g _            = False
      
          In the example, while `g (False:undefined)` evaluates to False,
          `f (False:undefined)` results in undefined as both `x` and `y`
          arguments are matched to `True`.
      
      For more information, see the wiki:
      
          https://ghc.haskell.org/trac/ghc/wiki/PatternSynonyms
          https://ghc.haskell.org/trac/ghc/wiki/PatternSynonyms/ImplementationReviewed-by: Simon Peyton Jones's avatarSimon Peyton Jones <simonpj@microsoft.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAustin Seipp <austin@well-typed.com>
      4f8369bf
  6. 09 Jan, 2014 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Re-work the naming story for the GHCi prompt (Trac #8649) · 73c08ab1
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      The basic idea here is simple, and described in Note [The interactive package]
      in HscTypes, which starts thus:
      
          Note [The interactive package]
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          Type and class declarations at the command prompt are treated as if
          they were defined in modules
             interactive:Ghci1
             interactive:Ghci2
             ...etc...
          with each bunch of declarations using a new module, all sharing a
          common package 'interactive' (see Module.interactivePackageId, and
          PrelNames.mkInteractiveModule).
      
          This scheme deals well with shadowing.  For example:
      
             ghci> data T = A
             ghci> data T = B
             ghci> :i A
             data Ghci1.T = A  -- Defined at <interactive>:2:10
      
          Here we must display info about constructor A, but its type T has been
          shadowed by the second declaration.  But it has a respectable
          qualified name (Ghci1.T), and its source location says where it was
          defined.
      
          So the main invariant continues to hold, that in any session an original
          name M.T only refers to oe unique thing.  (In a previous iteration both
          the T's above were called :Interactive.T, albeit with different uniques,
          which gave rise to all sorts of trouble.)
      
      This scheme deals nicely with the original problem.  It allows us to
      eliminate a couple of grotseque hacks
        - Note [Outputable Orig RdrName] in HscTypes
        - Note [interactive name cache] in IfaceEnv
      (both these comments have gone, because the hacks they describe are no
      longer necessary). I was also able to simplify Outputable.QueryQualifyName,
      so that it takes a Module/OccName as args rather than a Name.
      
      However, matters are never simple, and this change took me an
      unreasonably long time to get right.  There are some details in
      Note [The interactive package] in HscTypes.
      73c08ab1
  7. 03 Jan, 2014 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Refactor the way shadowing in handled in GHCi · 5dffb4ac
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      If you say
        ghci> import Foo( T )
        ghci> data T = MkT
        ghci> data T = XXX
      then the second 'data T' should shadow the first.  But the qualified
      Foo.T should still be available.  We really weren't handling this
      correctly at all, resulting in Trac #8639 and #8628 among others
      
      This patch:
      
      * Add RdrName.extendGlobalRdrEnv, which does shadowing properly
      
      * Change HscTypes.icExtendGblRdrEnv (was badly-named icPlusGblRdrEnv)
        to use the new function
      
      * Change RnNames.extendGobalRdrEnvRn to use the new function
      
      * Move gresFrom Avails into RdrName
      * Better pprGlobalRdrEnv function in RdrName
      5dffb4ac
  8. 03 Dec, 2013 1 commit
  9. 28 Nov, 2013 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      More faff to get GHCi's top-level environment right · f3a84161
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      This fixes #8540 (again), and simplifies matters a bit more. In
      particular, I got rid of ic_sys_vars altogether.  Mostly they can just
      go in ic_tythings, apart from dfuns, which are readily gettable from
      the instances anyway.
      
      See documentation in Note [Initialising the type environment for GHCi]
      in TcEnv.
      f3a84161
  10. 21 Nov, 2013 1 commit
  11. 23 Oct, 2013 1 commit
  12. 16 Oct, 2013 2 commits
  13. 22 Sep, 2013 1 commit
  14. 11 Sep, 2013 1 commit
  15. 03 Sep, 2013 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      Improve Linting in GHCi (fixes Trac #8215) · dfa8ef03
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      The original problem was that we weren't bringing varaibles bound in the
      interactive context into scope before Linting the result of a top-level
      declaration in GHCi.  (We were doing this for expressions.)
      
      Moreover I found that we weren't Linting the result of desugaring
      a GHCi expression, which we really should be doing.
      
      It took me a bit of time to unravel all this, and I did some refactoring
      to make it easier next time.
      
        * CoreMonad contains the Lint wrappers that get the right
          environments into place.  It always had endPass and lintPassResult
          (which Lints bindings), but now it has lintInteractiveExpr.
      
        * Both use a common function CoreMonad.interactiveInScope to find
          those in-scope variables.
      
      Quite a bit of knock-on effects from this, but nothing exciting.
      dfa8ef03
  16. 30 Jul, 2013 1 commit
  17. 28 Jul, 2013 1 commit
  18. 21 Jun, 2013 1 commit
    • eir@cis.upenn.edu's avatar
      Revise implementation of overlapping type family instances. · 569b2652
      eir@cis.upenn.edu authored
      This commit changes the syntax and story around overlapping type
      family instances. Before, we had "unbranched" instances and
      "branched" instances. Now, we have closed type families and
      open ones.
      
      The behavior of open families is completely unchanged. In particular,
      coincident overlap of open type family instances still works, despite
      emails to the contrary.
      
      A closed type family is declared like this:
      > type family F a where
      >   F Int = Bool
      >   F a   = Char
      The equations are tried in order, from top to bottom, subject to
      certain constraints, as described in the user manual. It is not
      allowed to declare an instance of a closed family.
      569b2652
  19. 14 May, 2013 1 commit
    • ian@well-typed.com's avatar
      Fix the GHC package DLL-splitting · 60b86b04
      ian@well-typed.com authored
      There's now an internal -dll-split flag, which we use to tell GHC how
      the GHC package is split into 2 separate DLLs. This is used by
      Packages.isDllName to determine whether a call is within the same
      DLL, or whether it is a call to another DLL.
      60b86b04
  20. 26 Apr, 2013 2 commits
  21. 15 Mar, 2013 1 commit
  22. 09 Mar, 2013 3 commits
  23. 07 Mar, 2013 1 commit
  24. 02 Mar, 2013 1 commit
  25. 22 Jan, 2013 1 commit
  26. 10 Jan, 2013 1 commit
  27. 19 Dec, 2012 1 commit
    • mad.one@gmail.com's avatar
      Rename all of the 'cmmz' flags and make them more consistent. · f6f881f0
      mad.one@gmail.com authored
      There's only a single compiler backend now, so the 'z' suffix means
      nothing. Also, the flags were confusingly named ('cmm-foo' vs
      'foo-cmm',) and counter-intuitively, '-ddump-cmm' did not do at all what
      you expected since the new backend went live.
      
      Basically, all of the -ddump-cmmz-* flags are now -ddump-cmm-*. Some were
      renamed to be more consistent.
      
      This doesn't update the manual; it already mentions '-ddump-cmm' and
      that flag implies all the others anyway, which is probably what you
      want.
      Signed-off-by: mad.one@gmail.com's avatarAustin Seipp <mad.one@gmail.com>
      f6f881f0
  28. 11 Dec, 2012 1 commit
  29. 12 Nov, 2012 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Remove OldCmm, convert backends to consume new Cmm · d92bd17f
      Simon Marlow authored
      This removes the OldCmm data type and the CmmCvt pass that converts
      new Cmm to OldCmm.  The backends (NCGs, LLVM and C) have all been
      converted to consume new Cmm.
      
      The main difference between the two data types is that conditional
      branches in new Cmm have both true/false successors, whereas in OldCmm
      the false case was a fallthrough.  To generate slightly better code we
      occasionally need to invert a conditional to ensure that the
      branch-not-taken becomes a fallthrough; this was previously done in
      CmmCvt, and it is now done in CmmContFlowOpt.
      
      We could go further and use the Hoopl Block representation for native
      code, which would mean that we could use Hoopl's postorderDfs and
      analyses for native code, but for now I've left it as is, using the
      old ListGraph representation for native code.
      d92bd17f
  30. 18 Oct, 2012 1 commit
    • ian@well-typed.com's avatar
      Refactor the way dump flags are handled · d4a19643
      ian@well-typed.com authored
      We were being inconsistent about how we tested whether dump flags
      were enabled; in particular, sometimes we also checked the verbosity,
      and sometimes we didn't.
      
      This lead to oddities such as "ghc -v4" printing an "Asm code" section
      which didn't contain any code, and "-v4" enabled some parts of
      "-ddump-deriv" but not others.
      
      Now all the tests use dopt, which also takes the verbosity into account
      as appropriate.
      d4a19643
  31. 16 Oct, 2012 1 commit
    • ian@well-typed.com's avatar
      Some alpha renaming · cd33eefd
      ian@well-typed.com authored
      Mostly d -> g (matching DynFlag -> GeneralFlag).
      Also renamed if* to when*, matching the Haskell if/when names
      cd33eefd
  32. 08 Oct, 2012 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Produce new-style Cmm from the Cmm parser · a7c0387d
      Simon Marlow authored
      The main change here is that the Cmm parser now allows high-level cmm
      code with argument-passing and function calls.  For example:
      
      foo ( gcptr a, bits32 b )
      {
        if (b > 0) {
           // we can make tail calls passing arguments:
           jump stg_ap_0_fast(a);
        }
      
        return (x,y);
      }
      
      More details on the new cmm syntax are in Note [Syntax of .cmm files]
      in CmmParse.y.
      
      The old syntax is still more-or-less supported for those occasional
      code fragments that really need to explicitly manipulate the stack.
      However there are a couple of differences: it is now obligatory to
      give a list of live GlobalRegs on every jump, e.g.
      
        jump %ENTRY_CODE(Sp(0)) [R1];
      
      Again, more details in Note [Syntax of .cmm files].
      
      I have rewritten most of the .cmm files in the RTS into the new
      syntax, except for AutoApply.cmm which is generated by the genapply
      program: this file could be generated in the new syntax instead and
      would probably be better off for it, but I ran out of enthusiasm.
      
      Some other changes in this batch:
      
       - The PrimOp calling convention is gone, primops now use the ordinary
         NativeNodeCall convention.  This means that primops and "foreign
         import prim" code must be written in high-level cmm, but they can
         now take more than 10 arguments.
      
       - CmmSink now does constant-folding (should fix #7219)
      
       - .cmm files now go through the cmmPipeline, and as a result we
         generate better code in many cases.  All the object files generated
         for the RTS .cmm files are now smaller.  Performance should be
         better too, but I haven't measured it yet.
      
       - RET_DYN frames are removed from the RTS, lots of code goes away
      
       - we now have some more canned GC points to cover unboxed-tuples with
         2-4 pointers, which will reduce code size a little.
      a7c0387d
  33. 03 Oct, 2012 1 commit
    • Simon Peyton Jones's avatar
      This big patch re-factors the way in which arrow-syntax is handled · ba56d20d
      Simon Peyton Jones authored
      All the work was done by Dan Winograd-Cort.
      
      The main thing is that arrow comamnds now have their own
      data type HsCmd (defined in HsExpr).  Previously it was
      punned with the HsExpr type, which was jolly confusing,
      and made it hard to do anything arrow-specific.
      
      To make this work, we now parameterise
        * MatchGroup
        * Match
        * GRHSs, GRHS
        * StmtLR and friends
      over the "body", that is the kind of thing they
      enclose.  This "body" parameter can be instantiated to
      either LHsExpr or LHsCmd respectively.
      
      Everything else is really a knock-on effect; there should
      be no change (yet!) in behaviour.  But it should be a sounder
      basis for fixing bugs.
      ba56d20d
  34. 26 Sep, 2012 1 commit
  35. 25 Sep, 2012 2 commits