Commit 8215287c authored by Ian Lynagh's avatar Ian Lynagh
Browse files

Doc tweaks

parent 559a5553
......@@ -184,7 +184,7 @@
dots replaced by the directory separator ('/' or '\', depending
on the system), and <replaceable>extension</replaceable> is a
source extension (<literal>hs</literal>, <literal>lhs</literal>)
if we are in <option>--make</option> mode and GHCi, or
if we are in <option>--make</option> mode or GHCi, or
<replaceable>hisuf</replaceable> otherwise.</para>
<para>For example, suppose the search path contains directories
......@@ -220,7 +220,7 @@
<para>This isn't the whole story: GHC also looks for modules in
pre-compiled libraries, known as packages. See the section on
packages (<xref linkend="packages"/>), for details.</para>
packages (<xref linkend="packages"/>) for details.</para>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="options-output">
......@@ -712,7 +712,7 @@ module A where
</para>
<para>To compile these three files, issue the following commands:
<programlisting>
ghc -c A.hs-boot -- Poduces A.hi-boot, A.o-boot
ghc -c A.hs-boot -- Produces A.hi-boot, A.o-boot
ghc -c B.hs -- Consumes A.hi-boot, produces B.hi, B.o
ghc -c A.hs -- Consumes B.hi, produces A.hi, A.o
ghc -o foo A.o B.o -- Linking the program
......@@ -778,7 +778,7 @@ When a hs-boot file <filename>A.hs-boot</filename>
<listitem><para> A module <literal>M</literal> that is
<literal>{-# SOURCE #-}</literal>-imported in a program will usually also be
ordinarily imported elsewhere. If not, <command>ghc --make</command>
automatically adds <literal>M</literal> to the set of moudles it tries to
automatically adds <literal>M</literal> to the set of modules it tries to
compile and link, to ensure that <literal>M</literal>'s implementation is included in
the final program.
</para></listitem>
......@@ -824,7 +824,7 @@ can be given abstractly, by omitting the '=' sign and everything that follows.
<programlisting>
data R (x :: * -&#62; *) y
</programlisting>
You cannot use <literal>deriving</literal> on a data type declaration; write in
You cannot use <literal>deriving</literal> on a data type declaration; write an
<literal>instance</literal> declaration instead.
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para> Class declarations is exactly as in Haskell, except that you may not put
......@@ -1184,7 +1184,7 @@ and GHC has no other reason for visiting the module. Example:
class C a where ...
</programlisting>
Here, neither D nor T is declared in module Orphan.
We call such modules ``orphan modules'',
We call such modules &ldquo;orphan modules&rdquo;,
defined thus:</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem> <para> An <emphasis>orphan module</emphasis>
......@@ -1195,7 +1195,7 @@ defined thus:</para>
<listitem><para> An instance declaration in a module M is an <emphasis>orphan instance</emphasis> if
<indexterm><primary>orphan instance</primary></indexterm>
none of the type constructors
or classes mentioned in the instance head (the part after the ``<literal>=&gt;</literal>'') are declared
or classes mentioned in the instance head (the part after the &ldquo;<literal>=&gt;</literal>&rdquo;) are declared
in M.</para>
<para> Only the instance head counts. In the example above, it is not good enough for C's declaration
......@@ -1219,8 +1219,8 @@ your best to have as few orphan modules as possible.
<para> You can identify an orphan module by looking in its interface
file, <filename>M.hi</filename>, using the
<option>--show-iface</option>. If there is a ``!'' on the first line,
GHC considers it an orphan module.
<option>--show-iface</option>. If there is a &ldquo;!&rdquo; on the
first line, GHC considers it an orphan module.
</para>
</sect2>
......
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