1. 27 Mar, 2006 1 commit
  2. 06 Mar, 2006 1 commit
  3. 12 Feb, 2006 1 commit
  4. 09 Feb, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Merge the smp and threaded RTS ways · eba7b660
      Simon Marlow authored
      Now, the threaded RTS also includes SMP support.  The -smp flag is a
      synonym for -threaded.  The performance implications of this are small
      to negligible, and it results in a code cleanup and reduces the number
      of combinations we have to test.
      eba7b660
  5. 25 Nov, 2005 1 commit
  6. 24 Nov, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-11-24 14:21:33 by simonmar] · 9df32c34
      simonmar authored
      unlockClosure() requires a write barrier for the compiler - write
      barriers aren't required for the CPU, but gcc re-orders non-aliasing
      writes unless we use an explicit barrier.
      
      This only just showed up when we started compiling the RTS with -O2.
      9df32c34
  7. 27 May, 2005 1 commit
  8. 24 May, 2005 1 commit
  9. 10 May, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-05-10 13:25:41 by simonmar] · bf821981
      simonmar authored
      Two SMP-related changes:
      
        - New storage manager interface:
      
          bdescr *allocateLocal(StgRegTable *reg, nat words)
      
          which allocates from the current thread's nursery (being careful
          not to clash with the heap pointer).  It can do this without
          taking any locks; the lock only has to be taken if a block needs
          to be allocated.  allocateLocal() is now used instead of allocate()
          in a few PrimOps.
      
          This removes locks from most Integer operations, cutting down
          the overhead for SMP a bit more.
      
          To make this work, we have to be able to grab the current thread's
          Capability out of thin air (i.e. when called from GMP), so the
          Capability subsystem needs to keep a hash from thread IDs to
          Capabilities.
      
        - Small MVar optimisation: instead of taking the global
          storage-manager lock, do our own locking of MVars with a bit of
          inline assembly (x86 only for now).
      bf821981
  10. 27 Mar, 2005 1 commit
    • panne's avatar
      [project @ 2005-03-27 13:41:13 by panne] · 03dc2dd3
      panne authored
      * Some preprocessors don't like the C99/C++ '//' comments after a
        directive, so use '/* */' instead. For consistency, a lot of '//' in
        the include files were converted, too.
      
      * UnDOSified libraries/base/cbits/runProcess.c.
      
      * My favourite sport: Killed $Id$s.
      03dc2dd3
  11. 28 Jan, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-01-28 12:55:17 by simonmar] · 153b9cb9
      simonmar authored
      Rationalise the BUILD,HOST,TARGET defines.
      
      Recall that:
      
        - build is the platform we're building on
        - host is the platform we're running on
        - target is the platform we're generating code for
      
      The change is that now we take these definitions as applying from the
      point of view of the particular source code being built, rather than
      the point of view of the whole build tree.
      
      For example, in RTS and library code, we were previously testing the
      TARGET platform.  But under the new rule, the platform on which this
      code is going to run is the HOST platform.  TARGET only makes sense in
      the compiler sources.
      
      In practical terms, this means that the values of BUILD, HOST & TARGET
      may vary depending on which part of the build tree we are in.
      
      Actual changes:
      
       - new file: includes/ghcplatform.h contains platform defines for
         the RTS and library code.
      
       - new file: includes/ghcautoconf.h contains the autoconf settings
         only (HAVE_BLAH).  This is so that we can get hold of these
         settings independently of the platform defines when necessary
         (eg. in GHC).
      
       - ghcconfig.h now #includes both ghcplatform.h and ghcautoconf.h.
      
       - MachRegs.h, which is included into both the compiler and the RTS,
         now has to cope with the fact that it might need to test either
         _TARGET_ or _HOST_ depending on the context.
      
       - the compiler's Makefile now generates
           stage{1,2,3}/ghc_boot_platform.h
         which contains platform defines for the compiler.  These differ
         depending on the stage, of course: in stage2, the HOST is the
         TARGET of stage1.  This was wrong before.
      
       - The compiler doesn't get platform info from Config.hs any more.
         Previously it did (sometimes), but unless we want to generate
         a new Config.hs for each stage we can't do this.
      
       - GHC now helpfully defines *_{BUILD,HOST}_{OS,ARCH} automatically
         in CPP'd Haskell source.
      
       - ghcplatform.h defines *_TARGET_* for backwards compatibility
         (ghcplatform.h is included by ghcconfig.h, which is included by
         config.h, so code which still #includes config.h will get the TARGET
         settings as before).
      
       - The Users's Guide is updated to mention *_HOST_* rather than
         *_TARGET_*.
      
       - coding-style.html in the commentary now contains a section on
         platform defines.  There are further doc updates to come.
      
      Thanks to Wolfgang Thaller for pointing me in the right direction.
      153b9cb9
  12. 04 Feb, 2002 1 commit
  13. 09 Feb, 2001 1 commit
  14. 08 Feb, 2001 1 commit
  15. 02 Nov, 1999 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 1999-11-02 15:05:38 by simonmar] · f6692611
      simonmar authored
      This commit adds in the current state of our SMP support.  Notably,
      this allows the new way 's' to be built, providing support for running
      multiple Haskell threads simultaneously on top of any pthreads
      implementation, the idea being to take advantage of commodity SMP
      boxes.
      
      Don't expect to get much of a speedup yet; due to the excessive
      locking required to synchronise access to mutable heap objects, you'll
      see a slowdown in most cases, even on a UP machine.  The best I've
      seen is a 1.6-1.7 speedup on an example that did no locking (two
      optimised nfibs in parallel).
      
      	- new RTS -N flag specifies how many pthreads to start.
      
      	- new driver -smp flag, tells the driver to use way 's'.
      
      	- new compiler -fsmp option (not for user comsumption)
      	  tells the compiler not to generate direct jumps to
      	  thunk entry code.
      
      	- largely rewritten scheduler
      
      	- _ccall_GC is now done by handing back a "token" to the
      	  RTS before executing the ccall; it should now be possible
      	  to execute blocking ccalls in the current thread while
      	  allowing the RTS to continue running Haskell threads as
      	  normal.
      
      	- you can only call thread-safe C libraries from a way 's'
      	  build, of course.
      
      Pthread support is still incomplete, and weird things (including
      deadlocks) are likely to happen.
      f6692611