1. 08 Jun, 2009 1 commit
  2. 04 Mar, 2009 2 commits
  3. 23 Feb, 2009 1 commit
  4. 16 Dec, 2008 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Rollback INLINE patches · e79c9ce0
      Simon Marlow authored
      rolling back:
      
      Fri Dec  5 16:54:00 GMT 2008  simonpj@microsoft.com
        * Completely new treatment of INLINE pragmas (big patch)
        
        This is a major patch, which changes the way INLINE pragmas work.
        Although lots of files are touched, the net is only +21 lines of
        code -- and I bet that most of those are comments!
        
        HEADS UP: interface file format has changed, so you'll need to
        recompile everything.
        
        There is not much effect on overall performance for nofib, 
        probably because those programs don't make heavy use of INLINE pragmas.
        
                Program           Size    Allocs   Runtime   Elapsed
                    Min         -11.3%     -6.9%     -9.2%     -8.2%
                    Max          -0.1%     +4.6%     +7.5%     +8.9%
         Geometric Mean          -2.2%     -0.2%     -1.0%     -0.8%
        
        (The +4.6% for on allocs is cichelli; see other patch relating to
        -fpass-case-bndr-to-join-points.)
        
        The old INLINE system
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        The old system worked like this. A function with an INLINE pragam
        got a right-hand side which looked like
             f = __inline_me__ (\xy. e)
        The __inline_me__ part was an InlineNote, and was treated specially
        in various ways.  Notably, the simplifier didn't inline inside an
        __inline_me__ note.  
        
        As a result, the code for f itself was pretty crappy. That matters
        if you say (map f xs), because then you execute the code for f,
        rather than inlining a copy at the call site.
        
        The new story: InlineRules
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        The new system removes the InlineMe Note altogether.  Instead there
        is a new constructor InlineRule in CoreSyn.Unfolding.  This is a 
        bit like a RULE, in that it remembers the template to be inlined inside
        the InlineRule.  No simplification or inlining is done on an InlineRule,
        just like RULEs.  
        
        An Id can have an InlineRule *or* a CoreUnfolding (since these are two
        constructors from Unfolding). The simplifier treats them differently:
        
          - An InlineRule is has the substitution applied (like RULES) but 
            is otherwise left undisturbed.
        
          - A CoreUnfolding is updated with the new RHS of the definition,
            on each iteration of the simplifier.
        
        An InlineRule fires regardless of size, but *only* when the function
        is applied to enough arguments.  The "arity" of the rule is specified
        (by the programmer) as the number of args on the LHS of the "=".  So
        it makes a difference whether you say
          	{-# INLINE f #-}
        	f x = \y -> e     or     f x y = e
        This is one of the big new features that InlineRule gives us, and it
        is one that Roman really wanted.
        
        In contrast, a CoreUnfolding can fire when it is applied to fewer
        args than than the function has lambdas, provided the result is small
        enough.
        
        
        Consequential stuff
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        * A 'wrapper' no longer has a WrapperInfo in the IdInfo.  Instead,
          the InlineRule has a field identifying wrappers.
        
        * Of course, IfaceSyn and interface serialisation changes appropriately.
        
        * Making implication constraints inline nicely was a bit fiddly. In
          the end I added a var_inline field to HsBInd.VarBind, which is why
          this patch affects the type checker slightly
        
        * I made some changes to the way in which eta expansion happens in
          CorePrep, mainly to ensure that *arguments* that become let-bound
          are also eta-expanded.  I'm still not too happy with the clarity
          and robustness fo the result.
        
        * We now complain if the programmer gives an INLINE pragma for
          a recursive function (prevsiously we just ignored it).  Reason for
          change: we don't want an InlineRule on a LoopBreaker, because then
          we'd have to check for loop-breaker-hood at occurrence sites (which
          isn't currenlty done).  Some tests need changing as a result.
        
        This patch has been in my tree for quite a while, so there are
        probably some other minor changes.
        
      
          M ./compiler/basicTypes/Id.lhs -11
          M ./compiler/basicTypes/IdInfo.lhs -82
          M ./compiler/basicTypes/MkId.lhs -2 +2
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CoreFVs.lhs -2 +25
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CoreLint.lhs -5 +1
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CorePrep.lhs -59 +53
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CoreSubst.lhs -22 +31
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CoreSyn.lhs -66 +92
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CoreUnfold.lhs -112 +112
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CoreUtils.lhs -185 +184
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/MkExternalCore.lhs -1
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/PprCore.lhs -4 +40
          M ./compiler/deSugar/DsBinds.lhs -70 +118
          M ./compiler/deSugar/DsForeign.lhs -2 +4
          M ./compiler/deSugar/DsMeta.hs -4 +3
          M ./compiler/hsSyn/HsBinds.lhs -3 +3
          M ./compiler/hsSyn/HsUtils.lhs -2 +7
          M ./compiler/iface/BinIface.hs -11 +25
          M ./compiler/iface/IfaceSyn.lhs -13 +21
          M ./compiler/iface/MkIface.lhs -24 +19
          M ./compiler/iface/TcIface.lhs -29 +23
          M ./compiler/main/TidyPgm.lhs -55 +49
          M ./compiler/parser/ParserCore.y -5 +6
          M ./compiler/simplCore/CSE.lhs -2 +1
          M ./compiler/simplCore/FloatIn.lhs -6 +1
          M ./compiler/simplCore/FloatOut.lhs -23
          M ./compiler/simplCore/OccurAnal.lhs -36 +5
          M ./compiler/simplCore/SetLevels.lhs -59 +54
          M ./compiler/simplCore/SimplCore.lhs -48 +52
          M ./compiler/simplCore/SimplEnv.lhs -26 +22
          M ./compiler/simplCore/SimplUtils.lhs -28 +4
          M ./compiler/simplCore/Simplify.lhs -91 +109
          M ./compiler/specialise/Specialise.lhs -15 +18
          M ./compiler/stranal/WorkWrap.lhs -14 +11
          M ./compiler/stranal/WwLib.lhs -2 +2
          M ./compiler/typecheck/Inst.lhs -1 +3
          M ./compiler/typecheck/TcBinds.lhs -17 +27
          M ./compiler/typecheck/TcClassDcl.lhs -1 +2
          M ./compiler/typecheck/TcExpr.lhs -4 +6
          M ./compiler/typecheck/TcForeign.lhs -1 +1
          M ./compiler/typecheck/TcGenDeriv.lhs -14 +13
          M ./compiler/typecheck/TcHsSyn.lhs -3 +2
          M ./compiler/typecheck/TcInstDcls.lhs -5 +4
          M ./compiler/typecheck/TcRnDriver.lhs -2 +11
          M ./compiler/typecheck/TcSimplify.lhs -10 +17
          M ./compiler/vectorise/VectType.hs +7
      
      Mon Dec  8 12:43:10 GMT 2008  simonpj@microsoft.com
        * White space only
      
          M ./compiler/simplCore/Simplify.lhs -2
      
      Mon Dec  8 12:48:40 GMT 2008  simonpj@microsoft.com
        * Move simpleOptExpr from CoreUnfold to CoreSubst
      
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CoreSubst.lhs -1 +87
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CoreUnfold.lhs -72 +1
      
      Mon Dec  8 17:30:18 GMT 2008  simonpj@microsoft.com
        * Use CoreSubst.simpleOptExpr in place of the ad-hoc simpleSubst (reduces code too)
      
          M ./compiler/deSugar/DsBinds.lhs -50 +16
      
      Tue Dec  9 17:03:02 GMT 2008  simonpj@microsoft.com
        * Fix Trac #2861: bogus eta expansion
        
        Urghlhl!  I "tided up" the treatment of the "state hack" in CoreUtils, but
        missed an unexpected interaction with the way that a bottoming function
        simply swallows excess arguments.  There's a long
             Note [State hack and bottoming functions]
        to explain (which accounts for most of the new lines of code).
        
      
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CoreUtils.lhs -16 +53
      
      Mon Dec 15 10:02:21 GMT 2008  Simon Marlow <marlowsd@gmail.com>
        * Revert CorePrep part of "Completely new treatment of INLINE pragmas..."
        
        The original patch said:
        
        * I made some changes to the way in which eta expansion happens in
          CorePrep, mainly to ensure that *arguments* that become let-bound
          are also eta-expanded.  I'm still not too happy with the clarity
          and robustness fo the result.
          
        Unfortunately this change apparently broke some invariants that were
        relied on elsewhere, and in particular lead to panics when compiling
        with profiling on.
        
        Will re-investigate in the new year.
      
          M ./compiler/coreSyn/CorePrep.lhs -53 +58
          M ./configure.ac -1 +1
      
      Mon Dec 15 12:28:51 GMT 2008  Simon Marlow <marlowsd@gmail.com>
        * revert accidental change to configure.ac
      
          M ./configure.ac -1 +1
      e79c9ce0
  5. 05 Dec, 2008 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Completely new treatment of INLINE pragmas (big patch) · d95ce839
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      This is a major patch, which changes the way INLINE pragmas work.
      Although lots of files are touched, the net is only +21 lines of
      code -- and I bet that most of those are comments!
      
      HEADS UP: interface file format has changed, so you'll need to
      recompile everything.
      
      There is not much effect on overall performance for nofib, 
      probably because those programs don't make heavy use of INLINE pragmas.
      
              Program           Size    Allocs   Runtime   Elapsed
                  Min         -11.3%     -6.9%     -9.2%     -8.2%
                  Max          -0.1%     +4.6%     +7.5%     +8.9%
       Geometric Mean          -2.2%     -0.2%     -1.0%     -0.8%
      
      (The +4.6% for on allocs is cichelli; see other patch relating to
      -fpass-case-bndr-to-join-points.)
      
      The old INLINE system
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      The old system worked like this. A function with an INLINE pragam
      got a right-hand side which looked like
           f = __inline_me__ (\xy. e)
      The __inline_me__ part was an InlineNote, and was treated specially
      in various ways.  Notably, the simplifier didn't inline inside an
      __inline_me__ note.  
      
      As a result, the code for f itself was pretty crappy. That matters
      if you say (map f xs), because then you execute the code for f,
      rather than inlining a copy at the call site.
      
      The new story: InlineRules
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      The new system removes the InlineMe Note altogether.  Instead there
      is a new constructor InlineRule in CoreSyn.Unfolding.  This is a 
      bit like a RULE, in that it remembers the template to be inlined inside
      the InlineRule.  No simplification or inlining is done on an InlineRule,
      just like RULEs.  
      
      An Id can have an InlineRule *or* a CoreUnfolding (since these are two
      constructors from Unfolding). The simplifier treats them differently:
      
        - An InlineRule is has the substitution applied (like RULES) but 
          is otherwise left undisturbed.
      
        - A CoreUnfolding is updated with the new RHS of the definition,
          on each iteration of the simplifier.
      
      An InlineRule fires regardless of size, but *only* when the function
      is applied to enough arguments.  The "arity" of the rule is specified
      (by the programmer) as the number of args on the LHS of the "=".  So
      it makes a difference whether you say
        	{-# INLINE f #-}
      	f x = \y -> e     or     f x y = e
      This is one of the big new features that InlineRule gives us, and it
      is one that Roman really wanted.
      
      In contrast, a CoreUnfolding can fire when it is applied to fewer
      args than than the function has lambdas, provided the result is small
      enough.
      
      
      Consequential stuff
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      * A 'wrapper' no longer has a WrapperInfo in the IdInfo.  Instead,
        the InlineRule has a field identifying wrappers.
      
      * Of course, IfaceSyn and interface serialisation changes appropriately.
      
      * Making implication constraints inline nicely was a bit fiddly. In
        the end I added a var_inline field to HsBInd.VarBind, which is why
        this patch affects the type checker slightly
      
      * I made some changes to the way in which eta expansion happens in
        CorePrep, mainly to ensure that *arguments* that become let-bound
        are also eta-expanded.  I'm still not too happy with the clarity
        and robustness fo the result.
      
      * We now complain if the programmer gives an INLINE pragma for
        a recursive function (prevsiously we just ignored it).  Reason for
        change: we don't want an InlineRule on a LoopBreaker, because then
        we'd have to check for loop-breaker-hood at occurrence sites (which
        isn't currenlty done).  Some tests need changing as a result.
      
      This patch has been in my tree for quite a while, so there are
      probably some other minor changes.
      d95ce839
  6. 14 Aug, 2008 1 commit
    • dias@eecs.harvard.edu's avatar
      Merging in the new codegen branch · 176fa33f
      dias@eecs.harvard.edu authored
      This merge does not turn on the new codegen (which only compiles
      a select few programs at this point),
      but it does introduce some changes to the old code generator.
      
      The high bits:
      1. The Rep Swamp patch is finally here.
         The highlight is that the representation of types at the
         machine level has changed.
         Consequently, this patch contains updates across several back ends.
      2. The new Stg -> Cmm path is here, although it appears to have a
         fair number of bugs lurking.
      3. Many improvements along the CmmCPSZ path, including:
         o stack layout
         o some code for infotables, half of which is right and half wrong
         o proc-point splitting
      176fa33f
  7. 31 Jul, 2008 1 commit
  8. 09 Jul, 2008 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      add -fwarn-dodgy-foreign-imports (see #1357) · 3b6382e4
      Simon Marlow authored
      From the entry in the User's guide:
      
      -fwarn-dodgy-foreign-imports causes a warning to be emitted for
      foreign imports of the following form:
      
      foreign import "f" f :: FunPtr t
      
      on the grounds that it probably should be
      
      foreign import "&f" f :: FunPtr t
      
      The first form declares that `f` is a (pure) C function that takes no
      arguments and returns a pointer to a C function with type `t`, whereas
      the second form declares that `f` itself is a C function with type
      `t`.  The first declaration is usually a mistake, and one that is hard
      to debug because it results in a crash, hence this warning.
      3b6382e4
  9. 06 Jun, 2008 1 commit
  10. 23 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  11. 12 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  12. 29 Mar, 2008 1 commit
  13. 17 Jan, 2008 1 commit
  14. 04 Sep, 2007 1 commit
  15. 03 Sep, 2007 1 commit
  16. 01 Sep, 2007 1 commit
  17. 28 Aug, 2007 1 commit
  18. 09 Aug, 2007 1 commit
  19. 11 May, 2007 1 commit
  20. 10 May, 2007 1 commit
  21. 10 Nov, 2006 1 commit
  22. 11 Oct, 2006 2 commits
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      ab22f4e6
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Interface file optimisation and removal of nameParent · b00b5bc0
      Simon Marlow authored
      This large commit combines several interrelated changes:
      
        - IfaceSyn now contains actual Names rather than the special
          IfaceExtName type.  The binary interface file contains
          a symbol table of Names, where each entry is a (package,
          ModuleName, OccName) triple.  Names in the IfaceSyn point
          to entries in the symbol table.
      
          This reduces the size of interface files, which should
          hopefully improve performance (not measured yet).
      
          The toIfaceXXX functions now do not need to pass around
          a function from Name -> IfaceExtName, which makes that
          code simpler.
      
        - Names now do not point directly to their parents, and the
          nameParent operation has gone away.  It turned out to be hard to
          keep this information consistent in practice, and the parent info
          was only valid in some Names.  Instead we made the following
          changes:
      
          * ImportAvails contains a new field 
                imp_parent :: NameEnv AvailInfo
            which gives the family info for any Name in scope, and
            is used by the renamer when renaming export lists, amongst
            other things.  This info is thrown away after renaming.
      
          * The mi_ver_fn field of ModIface now maps to
            (OccName,Version) instead of just Version, where the
            OccName is the parent name.  This mapping is used when
            constructing the usage info for dependent modules.
            There may be entries in mi_ver_fn for things that are not in
            scope, whereas imp_parent only deals with in-scope things.
      
          * The md_exports field of ModDetails now contains
            [AvailInfo] rather than NameSet.  This gives us
            family info for the exported names of a module.
      
      Also:
      
         - ifaceDeclSubBinders moved to IfaceSyn (seems like the
           right place for it).
      
         - heavily refactored renaming of import/export lists.
      
         - Unfortunately external core is now broken, as it relied on
           IfaceSyn.  It requires some attention.
      b00b5bc0
  23. 04 Oct, 2006 1 commit
  24. 23 Sep, 2006 1 commit
  25. 09 Aug, 2006 1 commit
  26. 11 Apr, 2006 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Allow IO to be wrapped in a newtype in foreign import/export · fb0f3349
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      Up to now, the silent unwrapping of newtypes in foreign import/export
      has been limited to data values.  But it's useful for the IO monad
      itself:
      
      	newtype MyIO a = MIO (IO a)
      
      	foreign import foo :: Int -> MyIO Int
      
      This patch allows the IO monad to be
      wrapped too. This applies to foreign import "dynamic" and "wrapper", 
      thus
         foreign import "wrapper" foo :: MyIO () -> HisIO (FunPtr (MyIO ())) 
      
      Warning: I did on the plane, and I'm no longer sure if its 100% 
      complete, so needs more testing.  In particular the wrapper/dynamic bit.
      fb0f3349
  27. 07 Apr, 2006 1 commit
    • Simon Marlow's avatar
      Reorganisation of the source tree · 0065d5ab
      Simon Marlow authored
      Most of the other users of the fptools build system have migrated to
      Cabal, and with the move to darcs we can now flatten the source tree
      without losing history, so here goes.
      
      The main change is that the ghc/ subdir is gone, and most of what it
      contained is now at the top level.  The build system now makes no
      pretense at being multi-project, it is just the GHC build system.
      
      No doubt this will break many things, and there will be a period of
      instability while we fix the dependencies.  A straightforward build
      should work, but I haven't yet fixed binary/source distributions.
      Changes to the Building Guide will follow, too.
      0065d5ab
  28. 25 Jan, 2006 1 commit
    • simonpj@microsoft.com's avatar
      Simon's big boxy-type commit · ac10f840
      simonpj@microsoft.com authored
      This very large commit adds impredicativity to GHC, plus
      numerous other small things.
        
      *** WARNING: I have compiled all the libraries, and
      ***	     a stage-2 compiler, and everything seems
      ***	     fine.  But don't grab this patch if you 
      ***	     can't tolerate a hiccup if something is
      ***	     broken.
        
      The big picture is this:
      
      a) GHC handles impredicative polymorphism, as described in the
         "Boxy types: type inference for higher-rank types and
         impredicativity" paper
      
      b) GHC handles GADTs in the new simplified (and very sligtly less
         epxrssive) way described in the
         "Simple unification-based type inference for GADTs" paper
      
        
      But there are lots of smaller changes, and since it was pre-Darcs
      they are not individually recorded.
        
      Some things to watch out for:
        
      c)   The story on lexically-scoped type variables has changed, as per
           my email.  I append the story below for completeness, but I 
           am still not happy with it, and it may change again.  In particular,
           the new story does not allow a pattern-bound scoped type variable
           to be wobbly, so (\(x::[a]) -> ...) is usually rejected.  This is
           more restrictive than before, and we might loosen up again.
        
      d)   A consequence of adding impredicativity is that GHC is a bit less
           gung ho about converting automatically between
        	(ty1 -> forall a. ty2)    and    (forall a. ty1 -> ty2)
           In particular, you may need to eta-expand some functions to make
           typechecking work again.
         
           Furthermore, functions are now invariant in their argument types,
           rather than being contravariant.  Again, the main consequence is
           that you may occasionally need to eta-expand function arguments when
           using higher-rank polymorphism.
        
      
      Please test, and let me know of any hiccups
      
      
      Scoped type variables in GHC
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      	January 2006
      
      0) Terminology.
         
         A *pattern binding* is of the form
      	pat = rhs
      
         A *function binding* is of the form
      	f pat1 .. patn = rhs
      
         A binding of the formm
      	var = rhs
         is treated as a (degenerate) *function binding*.
      
      
         A *declaration type signature* is a separate type signature for a
         let-bound or where-bound variable:
      	f :: Int -> Int
      
         A *pattern type signature* is a signature in a pattern: 
      	\(x::a) -> x
      	f (x::a) = x
      
         A *result type signature* is a signature on the result of a
         function definition:
      	f :: forall a. [a] -> a
      	head (x:xs) :: a = x
      
         The form
      	x :: a = rhs
         is treated as a (degnerate) function binding with a result
         type signature, not as a pattern binding.
      
      1) The main invariants:
      
           A) A lexically-scoped type variable always names a (rigid)
       	type variable (not an arbitrary type).  THIS IS A CHANGE.
              Previously, a scoped type variable named an arbitrary *type*.
      
           B) A type signature always describes a rigid type (since
      	its free (scoped) type variables name rigid type variables).
      	This is also a change, a consequence of (A).
      
           C) Distinct lexically-scoped type variables name distinct
      	rigid type variables.  This choice is open; 
      
      2) Scoping
      
      2(a) If a declaration type signature has an explicit forall, those type
         variables are brought into scope in the right hand side of the 
         corresponding binding (plus, for function bindings, the patterns on
         the LHS).  
      	f :: forall a. a -> [a]
      	f (x::a) = [x :: a, x]
         Both occurences of 'a' in the second line are bound by 
         the 'forall a' in the first line
      
         A declaration type signature *without* an explicit top-level forall
         is implicitly quantified over all the type variables that are
         mentioned in the type but not already in scope.  GHC's current
         rule is that this implicit quantification does *not* bring into scope
         any new scoped type variables.
      	f :: a -> a
      	f x = ...('a' is not in scope here)...
         This gives compatibility with Haskell 98
      
      2(b) A pattern type signature implicitly brings into scope any type
         variables mentioned in the type that are not already into scope.
         These are called *pattern-bound type variables*.
      	g :: a -> a -> [a]
      	g (x::a) (y::a) = [y :: a, x]
         The pattern type signature (x::a) brings 'a' into scope.
         The 'a' in the pattern (y::a) is bound, as is the occurrence on 
         the RHS.  
      
         A pattern type siganture is the only way you can bring existentials 
         into scope.
      	data T where
      	  MkT :: forall a. a -> (a->Int) -> T
      
      	f x = case x of
      		MkT (x::a) f -> f (x::a)
      
      2a) QUESTION
      	class C a where
      	  op :: forall b. b->a->a
      
      	instance C (T p q) where
      	  op = <rhs>
          Clearly p,q are in scope in <rhs>, but is 'b'?  Not at the moment.
          Nor can you add a type signature for op in the instance decl.
          You'd have to say this:
      	instance C (T p q) where
      	  op = let op' :: forall b. ...
      	           op' = <rhs>
      	       in op'
      
      3) A pattern-bound type variable is allowed only if the pattern's
         expected type is rigid.  Otherwise we don't know exactly *which*
         skolem the scoped type variable should be bound to, and that means
         we can't do GADT refinement.  This is invariant (A), and it is a 
         big change from the current situation.
      
      	f (x::a) = x	-- NO; pattern type is wobbly
      	
      	g1 :: b -> b
      	g1 (x::b) = x	-- YES, because the pattern type is rigid
      
      	g2 :: b -> b
      	g2 (x::c) = x	-- YES, same reason
      
      	h :: forall b. b -> b
      	h (x::b) = x	-- YES, but the inner b is bound
      
      	k :: forall b. b -> b
      	k (x::c) = x	-- NO, it can't be both b and c
      
      3a) You cannot give different names for the same type variable in the same scope
          (Invariant (C)):
      
      	f1 :: p -> p -> p		-- NO; because 'a' and 'b' would be
      	f1 (x::a) (y::b) = (x::a)	--     bound to the same type variable
      
      	f2 :: p -> p -> p		-- OK; 'a' is bound to the type variable
      	f2 (x::a) (y::a) = (x::a)	--     over which f2 is quantified
      					-- NB: 'p' is not lexically scoped
      
      	f3 :: forall p. p -> p -> p	-- NO: 'p' is now scoped, and is bound to
      	f3 (x::a) (y::a) = (x::a)	--     to the same type varialble as 'a'
      
      	f4 :: forall p. p -> p -> p	-- OK: 'p' is now scoped, and its occurences
      	f4 (x::p) (y::p) = (x::p)	--     in the patterns are bound by the forall
      
      
      3b) You can give a different name to the same type variable in different
          disjoint scopes, just as you can (if you want) give diferent names to 
          the same value parameter
      
      	g :: a -> Bool -> Maybe a
      	g (x::p) True  = Just x  :: Maybe p
      	g (y::q) False = Nothing :: Maybe q
      
      3c) Scoped type variables respect alpha renaming. For example, 
          function f2 from (3a) above could also be written:
      	f2' :: p -> p -> p
      	f2' (x::b) (y::b) = x::b
         where the scoped type variable is called 'b' instead of 'a'.
      
      
      4) Result type signatures obey the same rules as pattern types signatures.
         In particular, they can bind a type variable only if the result type is rigid
      
      	f x :: a = x	-- NO
      
      	g :: b -> b
      	g x :: b = x	-- YES; binds b in rhs
      
      5) A *pattern type signature* in a *pattern binding* cannot bind a 
         scoped type variable
      
      	(x::a, y) = ...		-- Legal only if 'a' is already in scope
      
         Reason: in type checking, the "expected type" of the LHS pattern is
         always wobbly, so we can't bind a rigid type variable.  (The exception
         would be for an existential type variable, but existentials are not
         allowed in pattern bindings either.)
       
         Even this is illegal
      	f :: forall a. a -> a
      	f x = let ((y::b)::a, z) = ... 
      	      in 
         Here it looks as if 'b' might get a rigid binding; but you can't bind
         it to the same skolem as a.
      
      6) Explicitly-forall'd type variables in the *declaration type signature(s)*
         for a *pattern binding* do not scope AT ALL.
      
      	x :: forall a. a->a	  -- NO; the forall a does 
      	Just (x::a->a) = Just id  --     not scope at all
      
      	y :: forall a. a->a
      	Just y = Just (id :: a->a)  -- NO; same reason
      
         THIS IS A CHANGE, but one I bet that very few people will notice.
         Here's why:
      
      	strange :: forall b. (b->b,b->b)
      	strange = (id,id)
      
      	x1 :: forall a. a->a
      	y1 :: forall b. b->b
      	(x1,y1) = strange
      
          This is legal Haskell 98 (modulo the forall). If both 'a' and 'b'
          both scoped over the RHS, they'd get unified and so cannot stand
          for distinct type variables. One could *imagine* allowing this:
         
      	x2 :: forall a. a->a
      	y2 :: forall a. a->a
      	(x2,y2) = strange
      
          using the very same type variable 'a' in both signatures, so that
          a single 'a' scopes over the RHS.  That seems defensible, but odd,
          because though there are two type signatures, they introduce just
          *one* scoped type variable, a.
      
      7) Possible extension.  We might consider allowing
      	\(x :: [ _ ]) -> <expr>
          where "_" is a wild card, to mean "x has type list of something", without
          naming the something.
      ac10f840
  29. 29 Jun, 2005 1 commit
  30. 18 Mar, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-03-18 13:37:27 by simonmar] · d1c1b7d0
      simonmar authored
      Flags cleanup.
      
      Basically the purpose of this commit is to move more of the compiler's
      global state into DynFlags, which is moving in the direction we need
      to go for the GHC API which can have multiple active sessions
      supported by a single GHC instance.
      
      Before:
      
      $ grep 'global_var' */*hs | wc -l
           78
      
      After:
      
      $ grep 'global_var' */*hs | wc -l
           27
      
      Well, it's an improvement.  Most of what's left won't really affect
      our ability to host multiple sessions.
      
      Lots of static flags have become dynamic flags (yay!).  Notably lots
      of flags that we used to think of as "driver" flags, like -I and -L,
      are now dynamic.  The most notable static flags left behind are the
      "way" flags, eg. -prof.  It would be nice to fix this, but it isn't
      urgent.
      
      On the way, lots of cleanup has happened.  Everything related to
      static and dynamic flags lives in StaticFlags and DynFlags
      respectively, and they share a common command-line parser library in
      CmdLineParser.  The flags related to modes (--makde, --interactive
      etc.) are now private to the front end: in fact private to Main
      itself, for now.
      d1c1b7d0
  31. 28 Jan, 2005 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2005-01-28 12:55:17 by simonmar] · 153b9cb9
      simonmar authored
      Rationalise the BUILD,HOST,TARGET defines.
      
      Recall that:
      
        - build is the platform we're building on
        - host is the platform we're running on
        - target is the platform we're generating code for
      
      The change is that now we take these definitions as applying from the
      point of view of the particular source code being built, rather than
      the point of view of the whole build tree.
      
      For example, in RTS and library code, we were previously testing the
      TARGET platform.  But under the new rule, the platform on which this
      code is going to run is the HOST platform.  TARGET only makes sense in
      the compiler sources.
      
      In practical terms, this means that the values of BUILD, HOST & TARGET
      may vary depending on which part of the build tree we are in.
      
      Actual changes:
      
       - new file: includes/ghcplatform.h contains platform defines for
         the RTS and library code.
      
       - new file: includes/ghcautoconf.h contains the autoconf settings
         only (HAVE_BLAH).  This is so that we can get hold of these
         settings independently of the platform defines when necessary
         (eg. in GHC).
      
       - ghcconfig.h now #includes both ghcplatform.h and ghcautoconf.h.
      
       - MachRegs.h, which is included into both the compiler and the RTS,
         now has to cope with the fact that it might need to test either
         _TARGET_ or _HOST_ depending on the context.
      
       - the compiler's Makefile now generates
           stage{1,2,3}/ghc_boot_platform.h
         which contains platform defines for the compiler.  These differ
         depending on the stage, of course: in stage2, the HOST is the
         TARGET of stage1.  This was wrong before.
      
       - The compiler doesn't get platform info from Config.hs any more.
         Previously it did (sometimes), but unless we want to generate
         a new Config.hs for each stage we can't do this.
      
       - GHC now helpfully defines *_{BUILD,HOST}_{OS,ARCH} automatically
         in CPP'd Haskell source.
      
       - ghcplatform.h defines *_TARGET_* for backwards compatibility
         (ghcplatform.h is included by ghcconfig.h, which is included by
         config.h, so code which still #includes config.h will get the TARGET
         settings as before).
      
       - The Users's Guide is updated to mention *_HOST_* rather than
         *_TARGET_*.
      
       - coding-style.html in the commentary now contains a section on
         platform defines.  There are further doc updates to come.
      
      Thanks to Wolfgang Thaller for pointing me in the right direction.
      153b9cb9
  32. 27 Jan, 2005 1 commit
    • simonpj's avatar
      [project @ 2005-01-27 10:44:00 by simonpj] · 508a505e
      simonpj authored
      --------------------------------------------
                Replace hi-boot files with hs-boot files
        	--------------------------------------------
      
      This major commit completely re-organises the way that recursive modules
      are dealt with.
      
        * It should have NO EFFECT if you do not use recursive modules
      
        * It is a BREAKING CHANGE if you do
      
      ====== Warning: .hi-file format has changed, so if you are
      ======		updating into an existing HEAD build, you'll
      ======		need to make clean and re-make
      
      
      The details:  [documentation still to be done]
      
      * Recursive loops are now broken with Foo.hs-boot (or Foo.lhs-boot),
        not Foo.hi-boot
      
      * An hs-boot files is a proper source file.  It is compiled just like
        a regular Haskell source file:
      	ghc Foo.hs		generates Foo.hi, Foo.o
      	ghc Foo.hs-boot		generates Foo.hi-boot, Foo.o-boot
      
      * hs-boot files are precisely a subset of Haskell. In particular:
      	- they have the same import, export, and scoping rules
      	- errors (such as kind errors) in hs-boot files are checked
        You do *not* need to mention the "original" name of something in
        an hs-boot file, any more than you do in any other Haskell module.
      
      * The Foo.hi-boot file generated by compiling Foo.hs-boot is a machine-
        generated interface file, in precisely the same format as Foo.hi
      
      * When compiling Foo.hs, its exports are checked for compatibility with
        Foo.hi-boot (previously generated by compiling Foo.hs-boot)
      
      * The dependency analyser (ghc -M) knows about Foo.hs-boot files, and
        generates appropriate dependencies.  For regular source files it
        generates
      	Foo.o : Foo.hs
      	Foo.o : Baz.hi		-- Foo.hs imports Baz
      	Foo.o : Bog.hi-boot	-- Foo.hs source-imports Bog
      
        For a hs-boot file it generates similar dependencies
      	Bog.o-boot : Bog.hs-boot
      	Bog.o-boot : Nib.hi	-- Bog.hs-boto imports Nib
      
      * ghc -M is also enhanced to use the compilation manager dependency
        chasing, so that
      	ghc -M Main
        will usually do the job.  No need to enumerate all the source files.
      
      * The -c flag is no longer a "compiler mode". It simply means "omit the
        link step", and synonymous with -no-link.
      508a505e
  33. 12 Jan, 2005 1 commit
  34. 30 Sep, 2004 1 commit
    • simonpj's avatar
      [project @ 2004-09-30 10:35:15 by simonpj] · 23f40f0e
      simonpj authored
      ------------------------------------
      	Add Generalised Algebraic Data Types
      	------------------------------------
      
      This rather big commit adds support for GADTs.  For example,
      
          data Term a where
       	  Lit :: Int -> Term Int
      	  App :: Term (a->b) -> Term a -> Term b
      	  If  :: Term Bool -> Term a -> Term a
      	  ..etc..
      
          eval :: Term a -> a
          eval (Lit i) = i
          eval (App a b) = eval a (eval b)
          eval (If p q r) | eval p    = eval q
          		    | otherwise = eval r
      
      
      Lots and lots of of related changes throughout the compiler to make
      this fit nicely.
      
      One important change, only loosely related to GADTs, is that skolem
      constants in the typechecker are genuinely immutable and constant, so
      we often get better error messages from the type checker.  See
      TcType.TcTyVarDetails.
      
      There's a new module types/Unify.lhs, which has purely-functional
      unification and matching for Type. This is used both in the typechecker
      (for type refinement of GADTs) and in Core Lint (also for type refinement).
      23f40f0e
  35. 13 Aug, 2004 1 commit
  36. 28 Jan, 2004 1 commit
  37. 30 Dec, 2003 1 commit
    • simonpj's avatar
      [project @ 2003-12-30 16:29:17 by simonpj] · f714e6b6
      simonpj authored
      ----------------------------
              Re-do kind inference (again)
      	----------------------------
      
         [WARNING: interface file binary representation has
         (as usual) changed slightly; recompile your libraries!]
      
      Inspired by the lambda-cube, for some time GHC has used
      	type Kind = Type
      That is, kinds were represented by the same data type as types.
      
      But GHC also supports unboxed types and unboxed tuples, and these
      complicate the kind system by requiring a sub-kind relationship.
      Notably, an unboxed tuple is acceptable as the *result* of a
      function but not as an *argument*.  So we have the following setup:
      
      		 ?
      		/ \
      	       /   \
      	      ??   (#)
      	     /  \
                  *   #
      
      where	*    [LiftedTypeKind]   means a lifted type
      	#    [UnliftedTypeKind] means an unlifted type
      	(#)  [UbxTupleKind]     means unboxed tuple
      	??   [ArgTypeKind]      is the lub of *,#
      	?    [OpenTypeKind]	means any type at all
      
      In particular:
      
        error :: forall a:?. String -> a
        (->)  :: ?? -> ? -> *
        (\(x::t) -> ...)	Here t::?? (i.e. not unboxed tuple)
      
      All this has beome rather difficult to accommodate with Kind=Type, so this
      commit splits the two.
      
        * Kind is a distinct type, defined in types/Kind.lhs
      
        * IfaceType.IfaceKind disappears: we just re-use Kind.Kind
      
        * TcUnify.unifyKind is a distinct unifier for kinds
      
        * TyCon no longer needs KindCon and SuperKindCon variants
      
        * TcUnify.zapExpectedType takes an expected Kind now, so that
          in TcPat.tcMonoPatBndr we can express that the bound variable
          must have an argTypeKind (??).
      
      The big change is really that kind inference is much more systematic and
      well behaved.  In particular, a kind variable can unify only with a
      "simple kind", which is built from * and (->).  This deals neatly
      with awkward questions about how we can combine sub-kinding with type
      inference.
      
      Lots of small consequential changes, especially to the kind-checking
      plumbing in TcTyClsDecls.  (We played a bit fast and loose before, and
      now we have to be more honest, in particular about how kind inference
      works for type synonyms.  They can have kinds like (* -> #), so
      
      This cures two long-standing SourceForge bugs
      
      * 753777 (tcfail115.hs), which used erroneously to pass,
        but crashed in the code generator
            type T a = Int -> (# Int, Int #)
            f :: T a -> T a
            f t = \x -> case t x of r -> r
      
      * 753780 (tc167.hs), which used erroneously to fail
            f :: (->) Int# Int#
      
      
      Still, the result is not entirely satisfactory.  In particular
      
      * The error message from tcfail115 is pretty obscure
      
      * SourceForge bug 807249 (Instance match failure on openTypeKind)
        is not fixed.  Alas.
      f714e6b6
  38. 10 Dec, 2003 1 commit
    • simonmar's avatar
      [project @ 2003-12-10 14:15:16 by simonmar] · 55042138
      simonmar authored
      Add accurate source location annotations to HsSyn
      -------------------------------------------------
      
      Every syntactic entity in HsSyn is now annotated with a SrcSpan, which
      details the exact beginning and end points of that entity in the
      original source file.  All honest compilers should do this, and it was
      about time GHC did the right thing.
      
      The most obvious benefit is that we now have much more accurate error
      messages; when running GHC inside emacs for example, the cursor will
      jump to the exact location of an error, not just a line somewhere
      nearby.  We haven't put a huge amount of effort into making sure all
      the error messages are accurate yet, so there could be some tweaking
      still needed, although the majority of messages I've seen have been
      spot-on.
      
      Error messages now contain a column number in addition to the line
      number, eg.
      
         read001.hs:25:10: Variable not in scope: `+#'
      
      To get the full text span info, use the new option -ferror-spans.  eg.
      
         read001.hs:25:10-11: Variable not in scope: `+#'
      
      I'm not sure whether we should do this by default.  Emacs won't
      understand the new error format, for one thing.
      
      In a more elaborate editor setting (eg. Visual Studio), we can arrange
      to actually highlight the subexpression containing an error.  Eventually
      this information will be used so we can find elements in the abstract
      syntax corresponding to text locations, for performing high-level editor
      functions (eg. "tell me the type of this expression I just highlighted").
      
      Performance of the compiler doesn't seem to be adversely affected.
      Parsing is still quicker than in 6.0.1, for example.
      
      Implementation:
      
      This was an excrutiatingly painful change to make: both Simon P.J. and
      myself have been working on it for the last three weeks or so.  The
      basic changes are:
      
       - a new datatype SrcSpan, which represents a beginning and end position
         in a source file.
      
       - To reduce the pain as much as possible, we also defined:
      
            data Located e = L SrcSpan e
      
       - Every datatype in HsSyn has an equivalent Located version.  eg.
      
            type LHsExpr id = Located (HsExpr id)
      
         and pretty much everywhere we used to use HsExpr we now use
         LHsExpr.  Believe me, we thought about this long and hard, and
         all the other options were worse :-)
      
      
      Additional changes/cleanups we made at the same time:
      
        - The abstract syntax for bindings is now less arcane.  MonoBinds
          and HsBinds with their built-in list constructors have gone away,
          replaced by HsBindGroup and HsBind (see HsSyn/HsBinds.lhs).
      
        - The various HsSyn type synonyms have now gone away (eg. RdrNameHsExpr,
          RenamedHsExpr, and TypecheckedHsExpr are now HsExpr RdrName,
          HsExpr Name, and HsExpr Id respectively).
      
        - Utilities over HsSyn are now collected in a new module HsUtils.
          More stuff still needs to be moved in here.
      
        - MachChar now has a real Char instead of an Int.  All GHC versions that
          can compile GHC now support 32-bit Chars, so this was a simplification.
      55042138